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Overview:
The U.S. National Central Bureau (USNCB) of INTERPOL is the American branch of the international police organization, serving as a communications clearing-house for police seeking assistance in criminal investigations that cross international boundaries. Directed by the U.S. Attorney General and working under the Department of Justice in conjunction with the Department of the Treasury, the USNCB focuses on fugitives, financial fraud, drug violations, terrorism and violent crimes. It can refuse to respond to any of the 200,000 annual inquiries from other nations and, as required by INTERPOL bylaws, does not assist in the capture of suspects.
more
History:
 
INTERPOL was founded in Austria in 1923 as the International Criminal Police Commission, created to facilitate cross-border police co-operation and help prevent international crime. Its headquarters was located in Vienna until Austria came under control of Nazi Germany during World War II, and the headquarters was moved to Berlin. For the remainder of the war, INTERPOL was a tool of the Gestapo, Germany’s secret police. Following the end of the war, European officials reorganized INTERPOL into today's organization, which is now headquartered in Lyon, France. INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 186 member countries.
 
The US bureau of INTERPOL did not come into existence until the 1960s because of reluctance on the part of American officials to embrace the organization. The FBI did not post wanted notices with INTERPOL until 1936. When FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover observed INTERPOL's success in apprehending criminals, he persuaded Congress to order the US Attorney General to accept INTERPOL membership in 1938. Hoover became the permanent American representative to INTERPOL, with only the FBI authorized to do business with the group. However, in 1950, Hoover pulled the FBI out of INTERPOL for reasons that remain unclear. The US Treasury Department did continue to maintain informal contact with INTERPOL and became the official U.S. representative in 1958.
 
It wasn’t until the administration of President John F. Kennedy that the US began moving toward a closer relationship with INTERPOL, thanks to US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's willingness to work with the organization as part of his fight against organized crime. The USNCB became operational in 1969 with a staff of three and an annual caseload of 300. Since then it has grown considerably, responding to the increasing internationalization of crime, as well as a jump in the numbers of foreign nationals entering the country. USNCB staff consists of agents, computer specialists, analysts and translators plus administrative and clerical support. The agents operate in divisions dedicated to specific investigative areas, while the analysts review case information to identify patterns and links. The USNCB operates by linking the Treasury Enforcement Computer System, the FBI's National Crime Information Center, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) files and DEA records to INTERPOL.
 
The U.S. began accepting counter-terrorism cases from INTERPOL in 1985. In 1990, the U.S. and Canadian governments established an INTERPOL interface between the USNCB and the Canadian NCB in Ottawa. This link allows police to tap into law enforcement networks across the border to verify driver registrations and vehicle ownership.
 
US officials, however, have been reluctant to fully trust INTERPOL with all American intelligence information. In fact, the vast majority of US information regarding international terrorism cases is not placed into INTERPOL’s system because of concerns by American officials that the system is not secure enough to prevent terrorists from tapping into the organization’s records.
 

History of INTERPOL

more
What it Does:
 
The U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL is the American branch of the international police organization, serving as a communications clearing-house for police seeking assistance in criminal investigations that cross international boundaries. Unlike the domestic and foreign law enforcement organizations it supports, USNCB is not tasked with solving crimes or apprehending suspects but rather with providing assistance to the law enforcement community by coordinating information for international investigations and providing communications between U.S. federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and the National Central Bureaus of other INTERPOL member countries. The USNCB also works with U.S. border agencies to check the identification of international criminals and fugitives trying to enter the country.
 
The bureau’s organizational structure consists of the Office of the Director and Deputy Director, Office of the General Counsel, INTERPOL Operations and Command Center, Alien/Fugitive Investigative Division, Terrorism and Violent Crimes Division,
Drug Investigative Division, Economic Crimes Division and State and Local Police Liaison.
 
The State and Local Police Liaison Division facilitates the exchange of information between foreign and domestic police. It also conducts training seminars on new developments in international police-to-police assistance. An INTERPOL liaison office is maintained in each state as well as in American Samoa, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands plus numerous major cities throughout the country. These offices are typically located within a state police agency, state bureau of investigation or major city and act as a point of contact for local law enforcement.
 
The USNCB provides many forms of assistance to law enforcement agencies under its Point of Contact for International Law Enforcement section. These include: General investigative services; law enforcement intelligence information; address verifications; all points bulletins; criminal record checks; disaster victim identification; humanitarian requests (death notifications, serious illness); voluntary interviews of witnesses; trace and locate fugitives wanted for extradition, missing persons and abducted children; locate stolen art and artifacts; telephone subscriber information (when court order not required); and weapons and vehicle traces.
 
As the US office for INTERPOL, the USNCB also is responsible for seeking the issuance of all INTERPOL notices on behalf of American authorities, alerting authorities to the existence of INTERPOL notices issued by other countries and communicating with the appropriate foreign or American authorities when the subject of a notice is located. A summary of INTERPOL’s color-coded notices system can be found here.
There are seven types of color-coded INTERPOL notices:
Red Notices: Seek the location and arrest of wanted persons with a view to extradition.
Blue Notices: Trace and locate, or collect information about a person of interest in a criminal investigation.
Green Notices: Provide warnings and information for crime prevention and public safety about persons who have committed criminal offences and are likely to be involved in criminal activity in other countries.
Yellow Notices: Locate missing persons, often minors, or help identify persons who are unable to identify themselves.
Black Notices: Seek information on unidentified bodies.
Orange Notices: Provide warnings about imminent threats that are likely to cause serious damage to property and/or injury to persons, including disguised weapons, parcel bombs and other dangerous materials.
INTERPOL-United Nations Special Notices: Warn about groups and individuals affiliated with Al Qaeda, the Taliban, and other terrorist organizations who are the targets of UN sanctions.

 

Wanted Fugitives

more
Where Does the Money Go:

 

The services of the USNCB are available to nearly 20,000 state and local law enforcement agencies throughout the country, providing help to hundreds of thousands police, sheriff and other law enforcement personnel. Numerous federal agencies, both law enforcement and non-law enforcement, are eligible to receive assistance from the USNCB including, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Customs Service, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Justice, Criminal Division. Federal agencies represented at the USNCB include:
more
Controversies:

 

In 2002 the USNCB found itself caught up in the controversial ban ordered by President George W. Bush that forbade employees at the US Justice Department from unionizing.
Invoking national security concerns, President Bush issued an executive order affecting 500 workers at US attorneys' offices, the Justice Department’s criminal division, the National Drug Intelligence Center, the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review and the USNCB. The order, issued in January, angered unions, which claimed the president was exploiting the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 four months earlier to pursue a campaign against unions.
 
Bush, Citing Security, Bans Some Unions at Justice Dept.
The New York Times reported in 2004 that INTERPOL's database is only useful with immigration efforts, including apprehending terrorist suspects, if it is used at border control points around the world. But few countries do so, including the US, where the USNCB accesses the database in Washington, DC, but not at major entry points into the country.  
 
If given access to the database, immigration officers at airports or border crossings could enter a passport number and get a near instantaneous response as to whether the passport had been stolen. From January to the end of July, nearly 200 stolen travel documents were discovered by police agencies checking the system.
 
The stolen documents on file were a small fraction of those circulating around the world. Still, INTERPOL says member countries should check all issued visas against the database to see which ones were obtained with a false document. The list of 1.7 million stolen documents fits on one floppy disk, making it easy for USNCB to share the information with immigration officials, if it chose to do so.

Bush, Citing Security, Bans Some Unions at Justice Dept.

(by Stephen Greenhouse, New York Times)

more

Comments

Cathi Fallin 3 months ago
Do you have a branch office in Dallas, TX? I was contacted today about a scam that happened to me. About a military man in Syria needing to get his lock box back to the states. Is this being investigated?
Andrew E 1 year ago
I want to travel to Europe in a few years but I’m scared I’ll be turned away at the border. Does the USNCB send a green notice for EVERYONE who is a registered sex offender or is it just high risk people?
DM 1 year ago
How can I find out if my name is on the interpole list? I went to Greece last summer and had to spend 30 days in prison because I owe for a loan in the UAE. I read this has been stopped and I can travel again? How can I find out.
Keith Bellinger 4 years ago
My debit card has been stolen by someone who apparently knows me and they went on a dating site and now the nca bureau is threatening me. What do I do
Richard E. Moore Jr 7 years ago
national central bureau i created an on line application inform on the interpol web –base system. it requested that i should print a version of my on line application form and covering letter to interpol of my country united state of american. after looking over the web site i am unable to find an e-mail or mailing address where i can send it. can you please assist me to whom i can send my application form too? i’m working in baghdad iraq as a contractor if you have any question pl...
TJ 10 years ago
Prior deporting someone do you check for outstanding warrants? The reason I ask is because I reported someone to ALL agencies to let them what a person was doing. The person I reported had warrants in three states that I'm aware of. He was deported without paying any consequences. That really HURT!!

Leave a comment

Founded: 1969
Annual Budget: $24 million
Employees: 130
U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL
Salzgaber, Wayne
Acting Director

Wayne H. Salzgaber was appointed acting director of the U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL on October 31, 2016. Having served as deputy director during the previous year, Salzgaber took over the directorship to replace retiring former director Geoffrey S. Shank.

 

After earning his B.A. degree in criminology from Florida’s Saint Leo University, Salzgaber enlisted in the United States Coast Guard (USCG), serving in operational and intelligence units responsible for port security, law enforcement, humanitarian missions and antiterrorism operations. Between August 1993 and December 1997, he was a law enforcement instructor at the U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Law Enforcement School in Yorkville, Virginia.

 

He then joined the Coast Guard Investigative Service (CGIS) as a special agent, remaining on active duty in USCG until 2001. He would return years later to serve, until 2010, as a commission officer in the USCG Reserves.

 

Salzgaber’s departure from the Guard coincided with an opportunity in October 2001 at the Department of the Treasury, where he joined its Office of Inspector General (OIG) as a special agent. In June 2003, he moved to the newly formed Office of Inspector General at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). During his seven-year tenure there, he helped establish the Office of Investigations and Special Investigations Division, for which he was named special agent in charge.

 

In August 2010, Salzgaber received an appointment to the Senior Executive Service as deputy assistant inspector general for investigations. In that position, he headed the DHS OIG’s Investigative Field Operations Division, which put him in charge of overseeing the agency’s investigative operations in 14 regional offices across the country. Then, in June 2012, he was made principal advisor to the Department of Homeland Security.

 

Three years later, in October 2015, Salzgaber was appointed deputy director of the U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL, a post he held until becoming acting director.

 

Salzgaber and his wife, Heather, have two daughters and one son.

-Danny Biederman

 

To Learn More:

Wayne Salzgaber: INTERPOL Interns Get First-Hand Experience (by Tom Temin, Federal Drive—audio interview)

Official Biography

more
Bray, Shawn
Previous Director

The U.S. Office of the International Criminal Police Organization, better known as Interpol, has had a new director since October 21, 2012. A 25-year veteran of federal law enforcement, Shawn A. Bray acts on behalf of the Attorney General as the official U.S. representative to Interpol, which is located in Lyon, France, and has 189 member nations. Since 2003, the U.S. National Central Bureau (USNCB) of Interpol has been under the alternating jurisdiction of the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which switch off every three years.

 

Born circa 1966 and raised outside St. Louis, Bray earned a B.S. in Criminal Justice at Truman State University (then Northeast Missouri State University) in Kirksville, Missouri, in 1988.

 

Bray started his career in 1988 as a U.S. Customs Service special agent in Arizona, where he was also assigned to work for Internal Affairs. In 2003, the Customs Service was merged with the Immigration and Naturalization Service to become U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), an agency in DHS. Within ICE, Bray served as a Homeland Security Investigations operations chief responsible for the Southeast region of the U.S. He also served as unit chief of ICE’s Cyber Crimes Center.

 

He joined USNCB Interpol in February 2010, serving as deputy director in Washington through October 2012.

 

Bray speaks fluent Spanish and is an enthusiastic owner of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

A Look Inside Interpol in Washington (by Christopher Snow Hopkins, National Journal)

more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:
The U.S. National Central Bureau (USNCB) of INTERPOL is the American branch of the international police organization, serving as a communications clearing-house for police seeking assistance in criminal investigations that cross international boundaries. Directed by the U.S. Attorney General and working under the Department of Justice in conjunction with the Department of the Treasury, the USNCB focuses on fugitives, financial fraud, drug violations, terrorism and violent crimes. It can refuse to respond to any of the 200,000 annual inquiries from other nations and, as required by INTERPOL bylaws, does not assist in the capture of suspects.
more
History:
 
INTERPOL was founded in Austria in 1923 as the International Criminal Police Commission, created to facilitate cross-border police co-operation and help prevent international crime. Its headquarters was located in Vienna until Austria came under control of Nazi Germany during World War II, and the headquarters was moved to Berlin. For the remainder of the war, INTERPOL was a tool of the Gestapo, Germany’s secret police. Following the end of the war, European officials reorganized INTERPOL into today's organization, which is now headquartered in Lyon, France. INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 186 member countries.
 
The US bureau of INTERPOL did not come into existence until the 1960s because of reluctance on the part of American officials to embrace the organization. The FBI did not post wanted notices with INTERPOL until 1936. When FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover observed INTERPOL's success in apprehending criminals, he persuaded Congress to order the US Attorney General to accept INTERPOL membership in 1938. Hoover became the permanent American representative to INTERPOL, with only the FBI authorized to do business with the group. However, in 1950, Hoover pulled the FBI out of INTERPOL for reasons that remain unclear. The US Treasury Department did continue to maintain informal contact with INTERPOL and became the official U.S. representative in 1958.
 
It wasn’t until the administration of President John F. Kennedy that the US began moving toward a closer relationship with INTERPOL, thanks to US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's willingness to work with the organization as part of his fight against organized crime. The USNCB became operational in 1969 with a staff of three and an annual caseload of 300. Since then it has grown considerably, responding to the increasing internationalization of crime, as well as a jump in the numbers of foreign nationals entering the country. USNCB staff consists of agents, computer specialists, analysts and translators plus administrative and clerical support. The agents operate in divisions dedicated to specific investigative areas, while the analysts review case information to identify patterns and links. The USNCB operates by linking the Treasury Enforcement Computer System, the FBI's National Crime Information Center, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) files and DEA records to INTERPOL.
 
The U.S. began accepting counter-terrorism cases from INTERPOL in 1985. In 1990, the U.S. and Canadian governments established an INTERPOL interface between the USNCB and the Canadian NCB in Ottawa. This link allows police to tap into law enforcement networks across the border to verify driver registrations and vehicle ownership.
 
US officials, however, have been reluctant to fully trust INTERPOL with all American intelligence information. In fact, the vast majority of US information regarding international terrorism cases is not placed into INTERPOL’s system because of concerns by American officials that the system is not secure enough to prevent terrorists from tapping into the organization’s records.
 

History of INTERPOL

more
What it Does:
 
The U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL is the American branch of the international police organization, serving as a communications clearing-house for police seeking assistance in criminal investigations that cross international boundaries. Unlike the domestic and foreign law enforcement organizations it supports, USNCB is not tasked with solving crimes or apprehending suspects but rather with providing assistance to the law enforcement community by coordinating information for international investigations and providing communications between U.S. federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and the National Central Bureaus of other INTERPOL member countries. The USNCB also works with U.S. border agencies to check the identification of international criminals and fugitives trying to enter the country.
 
The bureau’s organizational structure consists of the Office of the Director and Deputy Director, Office of the General Counsel, INTERPOL Operations and Command Center, Alien/Fugitive Investigative Division, Terrorism and Violent Crimes Division,
Drug Investigative Division, Economic Crimes Division and State and Local Police Liaison.
 
The State and Local Police Liaison Division facilitates the exchange of information between foreign and domestic police. It also conducts training seminars on new developments in international police-to-police assistance. An INTERPOL liaison office is maintained in each state as well as in American Samoa, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands plus numerous major cities throughout the country. These offices are typically located within a state police agency, state bureau of investigation or major city and act as a point of contact for local law enforcement.
 
The USNCB provides many forms of assistance to law enforcement agencies under its Point of Contact for International Law Enforcement section. These include: General investigative services; law enforcement intelligence information; address verifications; all points bulletins; criminal record checks; disaster victim identification; humanitarian requests (death notifications, serious illness); voluntary interviews of witnesses; trace and locate fugitives wanted for extradition, missing persons and abducted children; locate stolen art and artifacts; telephone subscriber information (when court order not required); and weapons and vehicle traces.
 
As the US office for INTERPOL, the USNCB also is responsible for seeking the issuance of all INTERPOL notices on behalf of American authorities, alerting authorities to the existence of INTERPOL notices issued by other countries and communicating with the appropriate foreign or American authorities when the subject of a notice is located. A summary of INTERPOL’s color-coded notices system can be found here.
There are seven types of color-coded INTERPOL notices:
Red Notices: Seek the location and arrest of wanted persons with a view to extradition.
Blue Notices: Trace and locate, or collect information about a person of interest in a criminal investigation.
Green Notices: Provide warnings and information for crime prevention and public safety about persons who have committed criminal offences and are likely to be involved in criminal activity in other countries.
Yellow Notices: Locate missing persons, often minors, or help identify persons who are unable to identify themselves.
Black Notices: Seek information on unidentified bodies.
Orange Notices: Provide warnings about imminent threats that are likely to cause serious damage to property and/or injury to persons, including disguised weapons, parcel bombs and other dangerous materials.
INTERPOL-United Nations Special Notices: Warn about groups and individuals affiliated with Al Qaeda, the Taliban, and other terrorist organizations who are the targets of UN sanctions.

 

Wanted Fugitives

more
Where Does the Money Go:

 

The services of the USNCB are available to nearly 20,000 state and local law enforcement agencies throughout the country, providing help to hundreds of thousands police, sheriff and other law enforcement personnel. Numerous federal agencies, both law enforcement and non-law enforcement, are eligible to receive assistance from the USNCB including, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Customs Service, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Justice, Criminal Division. Federal agencies represented at the USNCB include:
more
Controversies:

 

In 2002 the USNCB found itself caught up in the controversial ban ordered by President George W. Bush that forbade employees at the US Justice Department from unionizing.
Invoking national security concerns, President Bush issued an executive order affecting 500 workers at US attorneys' offices, the Justice Department’s criminal division, the National Drug Intelligence Center, the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review and the USNCB. The order, issued in January, angered unions, which claimed the president was exploiting the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 four months earlier to pursue a campaign against unions.
 
Bush, Citing Security, Bans Some Unions at Justice Dept.
The New York Times reported in 2004 that INTERPOL's database is only useful with immigration efforts, including apprehending terrorist suspects, if it is used at border control points around the world. But few countries do so, including the US, where the USNCB accesses the database in Washington, DC, but not at major entry points into the country.  
 
If given access to the database, immigration officers at airports or border crossings could enter a passport number and get a near instantaneous response as to whether the passport had been stolen. From January to the end of July, nearly 200 stolen travel documents were discovered by police agencies checking the system.
 
The stolen documents on file were a small fraction of those circulating around the world. Still, INTERPOL says member countries should check all issued visas against the database to see which ones were obtained with a false document. The list of 1.7 million stolen documents fits on one floppy disk, making it easy for USNCB to share the information with immigration officials, if it chose to do so.

Bush, Citing Security, Bans Some Unions at Justice Dept.

(by Stephen Greenhouse, New York Times)

more

Comments

Cathi Fallin 3 months ago
Do you have a branch office in Dallas, TX? I was contacted today about a scam that happened to me. About a military man in Syria needing to get his lock box back to the states. Is this being investigated?
Andrew E 1 year ago
I want to travel to Europe in a few years but I’m scared I’ll be turned away at the border. Does the USNCB send a green notice for EVERYONE who is a registered sex offender or is it just high risk people?
DM 1 year ago
How can I find out if my name is on the interpole list? I went to Greece last summer and had to spend 30 days in prison because I owe for a loan in the UAE. I read this has been stopped and I can travel again? How can I find out.
Keith Bellinger 4 years ago
My debit card has been stolen by someone who apparently knows me and they went on a dating site and now the nca bureau is threatening me. What do I do
Richard E. Moore Jr 7 years ago
national central bureau i created an on line application inform on the interpol web –base system. it requested that i should print a version of my on line application form and covering letter to interpol of my country united state of american. after looking over the web site i am unable to find an e-mail or mailing address where i can send it. can you please assist me to whom i can send my application form too? i’m working in baghdad iraq as a contractor if you have any question pl...
TJ 10 years ago
Prior deporting someone do you check for outstanding warrants? The reason I ask is because I reported someone to ALL agencies to let them what a person was doing. The person I reported had warrants in three states that I'm aware of. He was deported without paying any consequences. That really HURT!!

Leave a comment

Founded: 1969
Annual Budget: $24 million
Employees: 130
U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL
Salzgaber, Wayne
Acting Director

Wayne H. Salzgaber was appointed acting director of the U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL on October 31, 2016. Having served as deputy director during the previous year, Salzgaber took over the directorship to replace retiring former director Geoffrey S. Shank.

 

After earning his B.A. degree in criminology from Florida’s Saint Leo University, Salzgaber enlisted in the United States Coast Guard (USCG), serving in operational and intelligence units responsible for port security, law enforcement, humanitarian missions and antiterrorism operations. Between August 1993 and December 1997, he was a law enforcement instructor at the U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Law Enforcement School in Yorkville, Virginia.

 

He then joined the Coast Guard Investigative Service (CGIS) as a special agent, remaining on active duty in USCG until 2001. He would return years later to serve, until 2010, as a commission officer in the USCG Reserves.

 

Salzgaber’s departure from the Guard coincided with an opportunity in October 2001 at the Department of the Treasury, where he joined its Office of Inspector General (OIG) as a special agent. In June 2003, he moved to the newly formed Office of Inspector General at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). During his seven-year tenure there, he helped establish the Office of Investigations and Special Investigations Division, for which he was named special agent in charge.

 

In August 2010, Salzgaber received an appointment to the Senior Executive Service as deputy assistant inspector general for investigations. In that position, he headed the DHS OIG’s Investigative Field Operations Division, which put him in charge of overseeing the agency’s investigative operations in 14 regional offices across the country. Then, in June 2012, he was made principal advisor to the Department of Homeland Security.

 

Three years later, in October 2015, Salzgaber was appointed deputy director of the U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL, a post he held until becoming acting director.

 

Salzgaber and his wife, Heather, have two daughters and one son.

-Danny Biederman

 

To Learn More:

Wayne Salzgaber: INTERPOL Interns Get First-Hand Experience (by Tom Temin, Federal Drive—audio interview)

Official Biography

more
Bray, Shawn
Previous Director

The U.S. Office of the International Criminal Police Organization, better known as Interpol, has had a new director since October 21, 2012. A 25-year veteran of federal law enforcement, Shawn A. Bray acts on behalf of the Attorney General as the official U.S. representative to Interpol, which is located in Lyon, France, and has 189 member nations. Since 2003, the U.S. National Central Bureau (USNCB) of Interpol has been under the alternating jurisdiction of the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which switch off every three years.

 

Born circa 1966 and raised outside St. Louis, Bray earned a B.S. in Criminal Justice at Truman State University (then Northeast Missouri State University) in Kirksville, Missouri, in 1988.

 

Bray started his career in 1988 as a U.S. Customs Service special agent in Arizona, where he was also assigned to work for Internal Affairs. In 2003, the Customs Service was merged with the Immigration and Naturalization Service to become U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), an agency in DHS. Within ICE, Bray served as a Homeland Security Investigations operations chief responsible for the Southeast region of the U.S. He also served as unit chief of ICE’s Cyber Crimes Center.

 

He joined USNCB Interpol in February 2010, serving as deputy director in Washington through October 2012.

 

Bray speaks fluent Spanish and is an enthusiastic owner of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

A Look Inside Interpol in Washington (by Christopher Snow Hopkins, National Journal)

more