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Overview:
The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is responsible for printing federal reserve notes for the Federal Reserve and producing a variety of government security documents, like hand-engraved invitations, for the White House. The BEP also produces Treasury securities, identification cards and naturalization certificates. Unlike its counterpart, the US Mint, the BEP does not produce coins. Lastly, the BEP determines whether mutilated currency can be salvaged for use.
 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) grew from the US Treasury, which began issuing paper currency in 1861. At that time, individual workers signed, separated and trimmed sheets of Demand Notes in the Treasury Building in Washington, DC. The first home of the US Treasury was located at 1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, and from 1862 until 1880, most of the work of producing paper currency was done on machines in the basement and attic of the building. A dumbwaiter was used to help transport paper and printed money between the two floors.
 
By 1877, the Bureau of Engraving became the sole producer of all American currency, revenue stamps, government obligations and other security documents. The addition of postage stamp production in 1894 made the BEP the nation’s security printer. 
           
Also in 1877, the Secretary of the Treasury agreed with suggestions to house the operation in a fireproof building. The new site was chosen, and the land was purchased in June 1878 from William W. Corcoran, a banker and art gallery founder. The original Treasury building was completed at a cost of $300,000, and the agency took office in July 1880. 
           
Congress appropriated $2.3 million for the expansion of the old Treasury building in 1911. Developers chose to renovate the existing space and buy a second building, between 14th and 15th streets, and construct a new building. Although bad weather and a shortage of steel delayed the project, the building was completed in February 1914 at a cost of $2.88 million. 
           
By the 1920s, the BEP was looking again to expand. Congress appropriated $2 million in August 1935 for the land and construction of another new building. This building would also house the Public Debt Division of the Treasury Department.
           
In 1985, the Treasury Department authorized the BEP to begin the search for a site west of the Mississippi to produce currency. The move was intended to reduce transportation costs of moving currency back and forth to Federal Reserve Banks in San Francisco, Dallas and Kansas City. It also accommodated the need for additional currency to be produced and to implement additional security and emergency preparedness. After a nationwide search, 83 cities submitted proposals, and four cities made the final round. Eventually, Fort Worth, TX, was chosen to host the Western Currency Facility. 
           

The new site began producing currency in January 1991 and opened officially on April 26 of that same year. It joins the original facility in Washington, DC, to make BEP the largest producer of United States government security documents.

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

The US Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is responsible for producing all of the security documents for the United States. The BEP prints billions of Federal Reserve Notes for delivery to the Federal Reserve System each year from its facilities in Washington, DC, and Fort Worth, Texas. 
           
In addition to producing currency, the BEP produces other government security documents, such as portions of US passports, materials for the Department of Homeland Security, military identification cards and Immigration and Naturalization (INS) certificates. These documents are designed and manufactured with advanced counterfeit deterrence features. 
           

The BEP is also responsible for advising other federal agencies on matters of document security. The agency processes claims for the redemption of mutilated currency and uses its research and development efforts to focus on the continued use of automation in the production and counterfeit deterrence process for security documents.


 

more
Where Does the Money Go:

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) spent nearly $2 billion on 2,249 contractors this decade. According to USASpending.gov, the BEP paid for a variety of services, from nonmetallic fabricated materials to chemicals and chemical products.
 
The top 10 contractors are as follows:
Crane & Co., Inc.
$958,892,275
Sicpa Holding, SA
$258,689,738
WPP Group PLC
$74,320,397
Koenig & Bauer AG
$65,549,650
Haws & Tingle General Contractors, Inc.
$32,690,418
De La Rue Giori SA
$32,119,000
Raven Services Corporation
$27,823,597
Frank Parsons Paper Company, Inc.
$24,826,020
Electronic Systems Services, Inc.
$23,839,349
C & E Services, Inc.
$21,333,161
 

Crane & Co.

is a leading manufacturer of fiber and paper products, as well as other subsidiary businesses. As the BEP’s largest contractor, they produce the paper US currency is printed on.

Sicpa Holding, SA

, the agency’s second largest contractor, is a company providing security inks and integrated security systems for banknotes, documents of value and consumer goods.

 

more
Controversies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

"In God We Trust" Still Provokes Criticism
October, 1, 2007, marked the 50th anniversary of when the phrase, “In God We Trust,” first appeared on paper currency. While most Americans don’t object to the phrasing on paper currency, some do.
 
Critics include those who question how it affects the separation of church and state. Rev. Bob Galloway of the Metropolitan Community Church in Knoxville, TN, said printing “In God We Trust” on money is blasphemous. “I think it is demeaning to God,” said Galloway. “What we are doing is saying somehow that God blesses our money, (and) God blessing our money leads to a sense of capitalism that is completely outside of Jesus’ teaching.”
 
Elder Philip Hamilton of Mt. Zion Baptist Church said it was “hypocritical” to have the phrase on dollar bills. “Our nation has taken a turn, ignoring moral standards. We do everything to remove God out of society. ... Society is not trusting in God — it’s trusting in itself.”

“In God We Trust” marks 50 years on paper money

(by Millete Birhanemaskel, Knoxville News Sentinel)

 

more
Suggested Reforms:

 

 

 

 

 

 

BEP Changing Paper Currency to Thwart Counterfeiters
To stay ahead of attempts by counterfeiters to produce illegal copies of US currency, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing plans to redesign American currency every seven years to 10 years. That is a far cry from the practice for most of the 20th century when the currency stayed the same without any major changes. By order of Congress, the $1 bill, which accounts for 45% of the notes printed each year, will not be redesigned. Lawmakers were concerned about the cost to business if low-end vending machines that only take coins and $1 bills had to be upgraded. In addition to redesigning the money, the bureau is putting in new printing presses with more capabilities to handle the increasingly sophisticated security features.

 

$100 Bill to Get Facelift, Added Security (by Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press)

 

more

Comments

Debra 3 years ago
Myself, and many many others willing to countersunk against atheist suing to remove In God We Trust from our money. This ENTIRE NATION was founded IN GOD WE TRUST. They can move to another country! ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!!
Homer Connor 4 years ago
I suggest Susan B. Anthony for the new $20 bill.
hi 4 years ago
i love money
Ashton Alexander 6 years ago
Ashton Alexander 10615 Wolbrook St. Houston, Texas Ph# 713-631-4519 Attn. Larry fleix Jack Lew, Sir I Contacted The Treasury 01/28/2013, The Department of Printing & Engraving; damaged/mutilated bills. My letter was signed & dated 02/07/2013 by OSC mailroom, (RA079964057US). In my letter I explained I had drew $280.00 from my bank (01/22/2013) to complete a purchase. I allowed the seller to tear the bill in half, keeping ½ & I keeping the other half. I was not able to get my money back from the seller, so sent my half of the bills to the Treasury Department. I received the other half, so I sent a second letter to the Treasury Department, requesting the return of my previously sent money. I received a letter from the Treasury Department 06/28/2013, (Case # 13-03144) Mutilated Currency Div. Stating my claim for $240.00 is worthless and has no money value. Sir I do have the other half of my original bill, as I informed them, how can my claim be worthless?
Daryl Crotts 6 years ago
The BEP quit publishing production records in June 2011 with instructions that it was transitioning into a new reporting system. Here we are 21 months later and we still aren't getting monthly productions reports. What are they hiding by refusing to disclose information they previously did for many years?
Nancy Budd-North Valley Bank 7 years ago
i sent in some burnt currency to be processed for a customer in december of 2011, i have made several calls to find the status of this currency and my last two calls:after transferring me to an operator; i get a message that says this persons mailbox is full and can not recieve any more messages. could i please get someone to respond to me by email and i will give them the case# and whatever other info they may need. thanks for your help.
PAUL HIRSCHBERGER 7 years ago
hi about forty years ago at the davie chamber of comerce. a fellow named thomas fergson made a very informal talk.today on the tube (green piece )saw him . he was head. what happend to him? i wanted to give him a well done. paul hirschberger
mekenna norris 7 years ago
thanks for the info for my report!!!!! keep on keepin on!!
Rex Hirahara 9 years ago
I found some paper currency that is perhaps 40+ years old. It has been in a barn and is deteriorated and flakes apart if handled. I was able to insert approximately $150.00 in an envelope. It is very much intact but when I went to the Bank of America they could not replace the money and gave me a paper directing to this agency of our government. Where can I go to exchange this currency or what are the procedures to do so. Thank you ahead of time for your assistance, Rex Hira...
Rayford Vernon Pryor III 9 years ago
Dear Sirs / Mrs., I pray all is fine. I wanted to Check on Mrs. Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi reportedly turning OFF her OWN office Brochures and letterhead printed by the U.S.Engraving and Printing Office Washington,D.C. due to a report on a Medical H M O against the A.M.A./Fraud

Leave a comment

Founded: 1861
Annual Budget: $559.5 million
Employees: 2,169
Official Website: http://www.bep.treas.gov/
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Olijar, Len
Director

Leonard R. Olijar became the director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) in May 2015, after serving as BEP’s deputy director starting in January 2013. Located in the Treasury Department, BEP is responsible for printing U.S. currency (but not minting coins) and a variety of government documents, including Treasury securities, identification cards and naturalization certificates. BEP also decides whether mutilated currency can be salvaged for use or destroyed.

 

Born in September 1959, Leonard Richard Olijar grew up in a large family of seven children in Lower Burrell, Pennsylvania, a small town in the Allegheny-Kiski Valley about 23 miles northeast of Pittsburgh. After graduating Burrell High School in 1976, Olijar became the first person in his family to graduate college, earning a B.S. in Forest Products at Penn State University in 1980. After working a few jobs, Olijar returned to school and earned an accounting degree at the University of Colorado-Denver in 1987. 

 

Olijar has worked at BEP for 29 years, beginning his career in 1988 as a systems accountant implementing BEP’s first Enterprise Resource Planning system. Over the years, he rose gradually through the Bureau. 

 

In 2006, Olijar became BEP’s chief financial officer. He initiated the performance of BEP-wide risk assessments and began the implementation of a Lean Six Sigma program to improve customer service and efficiency. 

 

In 2012, Olijar served as the executive sponsor for BEP’s Best Place to Work initiative and the BEP was recognized as one of the most improved agencies.

 

Olijar resides in Centreville, Virginia, with his wife, Suzanne, with whom he has two daughters, Valerie and Sarah. 

-Matt Bewig

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

Lower Burrell Native Oversees U.S. Currency Printing Process (by Emily Balser, Greensburg Tribune-Review)

Agency of the Month Treasury Department: Leonard Olijar (Federal News Radio) (audio)

more
Felix, Larry
Previous Director
A native of New York, Larry R. Felix has served as director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing since January 11, 2006.
 
Felix holds degrees from the New York City College of Technology and the City College at the City University of New York. He did doctoral work in political economy at Columbia University.
           
Felix has spent 13 years at the bureau, serving as associate director for technology, chief of external relations, manager of marketing and deputy director. He also has chaired the Inter-agency Currency Design (ICD) taskforce, a group responsible for recommending technical enhancements to US currency design.
 
 
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:
The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is responsible for printing federal reserve notes for the Federal Reserve and producing a variety of government security documents, like hand-engraved invitations, for the White House. The BEP also produces Treasury securities, identification cards and naturalization certificates. Unlike its counterpart, the US Mint, the BEP does not produce coins. Lastly, the BEP determines whether mutilated currency can be salvaged for use.
 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) grew from the US Treasury, which began issuing paper currency in 1861. At that time, individual workers signed, separated and trimmed sheets of Demand Notes in the Treasury Building in Washington, DC. The first home of the US Treasury was located at 1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, and from 1862 until 1880, most of the work of producing paper currency was done on machines in the basement and attic of the building. A dumbwaiter was used to help transport paper and printed money between the two floors.
 
By 1877, the Bureau of Engraving became the sole producer of all American currency, revenue stamps, government obligations and other security documents. The addition of postage stamp production in 1894 made the BEP the nation’s security printer. 
           
Also in 1877, the Secretary of the Treasury agreed with suggestions to house the operation in a fireproof building. The new site was chosen, and the land was purchased in June 1878 from William W. Corcoran, a banker and art gallery founder. The original Treasury building was completed at a cost of $300,000, and the agency took office in July 1880. 
           
Congress appropriated $2.3 million for the expansion of the old Treasury building in 1911. Developers chose to renovate the existing space and buy a second building, between 14th and 15th streets, and construct a new building. Although bad weather and a shortage of steel delayed the project, the building was completed in February 1914 at a cost of $2.88 million. 
           
By the 1920s, the BEP was looking again to expand. Congress appropriated $2 million in August 1935 for the land and construction of another new building. This building would also house the Public Debt Division of the Treasury Department.
           
In 1985, the Treasury Department authorized the BEP to begin the search for a site west of the Mississippi to produce currency. The move was intended to reduce transportation costs of moving currency back and forth to Federal Reserve Banks in San Francisco, Dallas and Kansas City. It also accommodated the need for additional currency to be produced and to implement additional security and emergency preparedness. After a nationwide search, 83 cities submitted proposals, and four cities made the final round. Eventually, Fort Worth, TX, was chosen to host the Western Currency Facility. 
           

The new site began producing currency in January 1991 and opened officially on April 26 of that same year. It joins the original facility in Washington, DC, to make BEP the largest producer of United States government security documents.

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

The US Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is responsible for producing all of the security documents for the United States. The BEP prints billions of Federal Reserve Notes for delivery to the Federal Reserve System each year from its facilities in Washington, DC, and Fort Worth, Texas. 
           
In addition to producing currency, the BEP produces other government security documents, such as portions of US passports, materials for the Department of Homeland Security, military identification cards and Immigration and Naturalization (INS) certificates. These documents are designed and manufactured with advanced counterfeit deterrence features. 
           

The BEP is also responsible for advising other federal agencies on matters of document security. The agency processes claims for the redemption of mutilated currency and uses its research and development efforts to focus on the continued use of automation in the production and counterfeit deterrence process for security documents.


 

more
Where Does the Money Go:

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) spent nearly $2 billion on 2,249 contractors this decade. According to USASpending.gov, the BEP paid for a variety of services, from nonmetallic fabricated materials to chemicals and chemical products.
 
The top 10 contractors are as follows:
Crane & Co., Inc.
$958,892,275
Sicpa Holding, SA
$258,689,738
WPP Group PLC
$74,320,397
Koenig & Bauer AG
$65,549,650
Haws & Tingle General Contractors, Inc.
$32,690,418
De La Rue Giori SA
$32,119,000
Raven Services Corporation
$27,823,597
Frank Parsons Paper Company, Inc.
$24,826,020
Electronic Systems Services, Inc.
$23,839,349
C & E Services, Inc.
$21,333,161
 

Crane & Co.

is a leading manufacturer of fiber and paper products, as well as other subsidiary businesses. As the BEP’s largest contractor, they produce the paper US currency is printed on.

Sicpa Holding, SA

, the agency’s second largest contractor, is a company providing security inks and integrated security systems for banknotes, documents of value and consumer goods.

 

more
Controversies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

"In God We Trust" Still Provokes Criticism
October, 1, 2007, marked the 50th anniversary of when the phrase, “In God We Trust,” first appeared on paper currency. While most Americans don’t object to the phrasing on paper currency, some do.
 
Critics include those who question how it affects the separation of church and state. Rev. Bob Galloway of the Metropolitan Community Church in Knoxville, TN, said printing “In God We Trust” on money is blasphemous. “I think it is demeaning to God,” said Galloway. “What we are doing is saying somehow that God blesses our money, (and) God blessing our money leads to a sense of capitalism that is completely outside of Jesus’ teaching.”
 
Elder Philip Hamilton of Mt. Zion Baptist Church said it was “hypocritical” to have the phrase on dollar bills. “Our nation has taken a turn, ignoring moral standards. We do everything to remove God out of society. ... Society is not trusting in God — it’s trusting in itself.”

“In God We Trust” marks 50 years on paper money

(by Millete Birhanemaskel, Knoxville News Sentinel)

 

more
Suggested Reforms:

 

 

 

 

 

 

BEP Changing Paper Currency to Thwart Counterfeiters
To stay ahead of attempts by counterfeiters to produce illegal copies of US currency, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing plans to redesign American currency every seven years to 10 years. That is a far cry from the practice for most of the 20th century when the currency stayed the same without any major changes. By order of Congress, the $1 bill, which accounts for 45% of the notes printed each year, will not be redesigned. Lawmakers were concerned about the cost to business if low-end vending machines that only take coins and $1 bills had to be upgraded. In addition to redesigning the money, the bureau is putting in new printing presses with more capabilities to handle the increasingly sophisticated security features.

 

$100 Bill to Get Facelift, Added Security (by Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press)

 

more

Comments

Debra 3 years ago
Myself, and many many others willing to countersunk against atheist suing to remove In God We Trust from our money. This ENTIRE NATION was founded IN GOD WE TRUST. They can move to another country! ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!!
Homer Connor 4 years ago
I suggest Susan B. Anthony for the new $20 bill.
hi 4 years ago
i love money
Ashton Alexander 6 years ago
Ashton Alexander 10615 Wolbrook St. Houston, Texas Ph# 713-631-4519 Attn. Larry fleix Jack Lew, Sir I Contacted The Treasury 01/28/2013, The Department of Printing & Engraving; damaged/mutilated bills. My letter was signed & dated 02/07/2013 by OSC mailroom, (RA079964057US). In my letter I explained I had drew $280.00 from my bank (01/22/2013) to complete a purchase. I allowed the seller to tear the bill in half, keeping ½ & I keeping the other half. I was not able to get my money back from the seller, so sent my half of the bills to the Treasury Department. I received the other half, so I sent a second letter to the Treasury Department, requesting the return of my previously sent money. I received a letter from the Treasury Department 06/28/2013, (Case # 13-03144) Mutilated Currency Div. Stating my claim for $240.00 is worthless and has no money value. Sir I do have the other half of my original bill, as I informed them, how can my claim be worthless?
Daryl Crotts 6 years ago
The BEP quit publishing production records in June 2011 with instructions that it was transitioning into a new reporting system. Here we are 21 months later and we still aren't getting monthly productions reports. What are they hiding by refusing to disclose information they previously did for many years?
Nancy Budd-North Valley Bank 7 years ago
i sent in some burnt currency to be processed for a customer in december of 2011, i have made several calls to find the status of this currency and my last two calls:after transferring me to an operator; i get a message that says this persons mailbox is full and can not recieve any more messages. could i please get someone to respond to me by email and i will give them the case# and whatever other info they may need. thanks for your help.
PAUL HIRSCHBERGER 7 years ago
hi about forty years ago at the davie chamber of comerce. a fellow named thomas fergson made a very informal talk.today on the tube (green piece )saw him . he was head. what happend to him? i wanted to give him a well done. paul hirschberger
mekenna norris 7 years ago
thanks for the info for my report!!!!! keep on keepin on!!
Rex Hirahara 9 years ago
I found some paper currency that is perhaps 40+ years old. It has been in a barn and is deteriorated and flakes apart if handled. I was able to insert approximately $150.00 in an envelope. It is very much intact but when I went to the Bank of America they could not replace the money and gave me a paper directing to this agency of our government. Where can I go to exchange this currency or what are the procedures to do so. Thank you ahead of time for your assistance, Rex Hira...
Rayford Vernon Pryor III 9 years ago
Dear Sirs / Mrs., I pray all is fine. I wanted to Check on Mrs. Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi reportedly turning OFF her OWN office Brochures and letterhead printed by the U.S.Engraving and Printing Office Washington,D.C. due to a report on a Medical H M O against the A.M.A./Fraud

Leave a comment

Founded: 1861
Annual Budget: $559.5 million
Employees: 2,169
Official Website: http://www.bep.treas.gov/
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Olijar, Len
Director

Leonard R. Olijar became the director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) in May 2015, after serving as BEP’s deputy director starting in January 2013. Located in the Treasury Department, BEP is responsible for printing U.S. currency (but not minting coins) and a variety of government documents, including Treasury securities, identification cards and naturalization certificates. BEP also decides whether mutilated currency can be salvaged for use or destroyed.

 

Born in September 1959, Leonard Richard Olijar grew up in a large family of seven children in Lower Burrell, Pennsylvania, a small town in the Allegheny-Kiski Valley about 23 miles northeast of Pittsburgh. After graduating Burrell High School in 1976, Olijar became the first person in his family to graduate college, earning a B.S. in Forest Products at Penn State University in 1980. After working a few jobs, Olijar returned to school and earned an accounting degree at the University of Colorado-Denver in 1987. 

 

Olijar has worked at BEP for 29 years, beginning his career in 1988 as a systems accountant implementing BEP’s first Enterprise Resource Planning system. Over the years, he rose gradually through the Bureau. 

 

In 2006, Olijar became BEP’s chief financial officer. He initiated the performance of BEP-wide risk assessments and began the implementation of a Lean Six Sigma program to improve customer service and efficiency. 

 

In 2012, Olijar served as the executive sponsor for BEP’s Best Place to Work initiative and the BEP was recognized as one of the most improved agencies.

 

Olijar resides in Centreville, Virginia, with his wife, Suzanne, with whom he has two daughters, Valerie and Sarah. 

-Matt Bewig

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

Lower Burrell Native Oversees U.S. Currency Printing Process (by Emily Balser, Greensburg Tribune-Review)

Agency of the Month Treasury Department: Leonard Olijar (Federal News Radio) (audio)

more
Felix, Larry
Previous Director
A native of New York, Larry R. Felix has served as director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing since January 11, 2006.
 
Felix holds degrees from the New York City College of Technology and the City College at the City University of New York. He did doctoral work in political economy at Columbia University.
           
Felix has spent 13 years at the bureau, serving as associate director for technology, chief of external relations, manager of marketing and deputy director. He also has chaired the Inter-agency Currency Design (ICD) taskforce, a group responsible for recommending technical enhancements to US currency design.
 
 
more