Controversies

49 to 64 of about 4787 News
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U.S. Teens Slipping in Math Proficiency, Stagnant in Science and Reading

American students have a math problem. "We're losing ground — a troubling prospect when, in today's knowledge-based economy, the best jobs can go anywhere in the world," said Education Secretary John B. King Jr. The PISA study is the latest to document that American students are underperforming their peers in several Asian nations. "Everything is just going down," said Peggy Carr, acting commissioner at the National Center for Education Statistics.   read more

Killing of Truck Safety Rules by GOP Lawmakers Portends Broad Rollback of Transportation Safety Regulations

Republican lawmakers effectively blocked Obama safety rules aimed at keeping tired truckers off the highway. But there's more coming down the road. American Trucking is pledging to come back next month, when Republicans are in control, and try to block state laws that require additional rest breaks for truckers beyond what federal rules require. The group says there should be one national rule on work hours for interstate truckers and that the extra breaks aren't necessary for safety.   read more

After 3 Years, New York’s Promise to Videotape Criminal Interrogations Remains Unfulfilled

Recording interrogations is a way to know whether police can be confident in the confessions that result. City officials say that 5,000 interrogations have been recorded, and that every detective bureau now has the equipment. But two judges testified that they had seen few cases in which the interrogations — as opposed to the confessions — were recorded. “One can speculate that some old-fashioned detectives may not want to have their methods on video as it might embarrass them,” said Dwyer.   read more

Record 50,000 U.S. Drug Overdose Deaths in 2015

Deaths from synthetic opioids, including illicit fentanyl, rose 73 percent to 9,580. And prescription painkillers took the highest toll, but posted the smallest increase. Abuse of drugs like Oxycontin and Vicodin killed 17,536, an increase of 4 percent. "I don't think we've ever seen anything like this. Certainly not in modern times," said Robert Anderson, who oversees death statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   read more

Libraries Become Unexpected Sites of Hate Crimes

Inside a book about the Quran, someone had written “lies cover to cover,” drawn a swastika and made a disparaging remark about the Prophet Muhammad. Six more books about Islam and the Quran that had been similarly defaced with racist language and imagery. Authorities say the spate of hate crimes targeting libraries, their books or patrons had rarely seen before. These crimes coincide with a recent FBI report that attacks against American Muslims surged last year.   read more

Big Business Warns Trump of Damage to Economy from Mass Deportations

Business groups note that experts predict negative economic fallout should Trump pursue mass deportation. A study by right-leaning American Action Network found that such a plan could reduce "real GDP by $1 trillion" and cost taxpayers more than $400 billion. Public opinion appears to be on their side. One survey found that 60% of Trump backers said immigrants in the country illegally should be able to stay. A third of Trump supporters said law enforcement should deport all such immigrants.   read more

Disbelief in New Mexico’s Rape Victims, Resulting in a Thousand Untested Rape Kits, May Discourage Victim Reporting

New Mexico leads the nation with a backlog of 5,000 untested evidence kits from sexual assaults. Audit officer Sarita Nair said the "heartbreaking" statistics reinforce the concerns of sex assault victims who are reluctant to come forward for fear of not being believed. "When we see a kit on a shelf and the reason is a lack of perceived victim credibility, we're just sort of reinforcing those worst fears and we're discouraging people from coming forward — and that just has to stop," she said.   read more

Surgeon General Sounds Warning on Widespread Use of E-Cigarettes by Nation’s Youth

Soaring use of e-cigarettes among young people “is now a major public health concern,” according to the surgeon general. The report from the nation’s highest public-health authority finds that e-cigarettes are now the most commonly used tobacco product among youths, surpassing tobacco cigarettes. E-cigarettes, which turn nicotine into inhalable vapor, can harm developing brains of teenagers who use them and also can create harmful aerosol for people around the user.   read more

California Lawmakers to Enact Sweeping Laws to Resist Trump’s Mass Immigrant Deportation Threats

“Throughout the presidential campaign and since, the president-elect has made many troubling statements that run counter to the principles that define California today,” said Kevin de León, the state Senate president pro tempore, “If the president-elect has identified 2 to 3 million criminal immigrants, we can only assume it’s a pretense to open up criteria to deport mothers who are pulled over for a broken taillight. We want to ensure that those facing deportation are afforded due process...”   read more

Decades-Long Trend of Rising Life Expectancy in U.S. Undergoes Mysterious Reversal

Popular theories for the cause of the decline, including an increase in obesity rates and an opiod epidemic, fail to explain a problem that feels broader. “If you actually dissect the data, neither of those arguments hold,” said Muennig. “This report slams it home that this is really a mystery.” Researchers suspect that the strain of income inequality in the U.S. -- and the stress that this causes — could be a major contributing factor to the uptick, but it has been hard to prove.   read more

Mass Deportations Damage U.S. Housing Market by Exacerbating Foreclosures

These findings reveal the spiraling and often unseen effects of mass deportations, a point that is no longer purely academic as Donald Trump weighs whether to make good on his campaign promise to deport millions of unauthorized immigrants. Previous research suggests that Hispanic households, like black ones, were disproportionately victimized by subprime lending schemes. But the fact that foreclosure rates among Hispanics surpassed those among blacks points to something else going on.   read more

Trump’s Cyberbullying of Union Boss Called “Dark and Disturbing” Assault on Right to Dissent

With the full power of the presidency just weeks away, Trump’s decision to single out Jones for ridicule has drawn condemnation from historians and White House veterans. “When you attack a man for living an ordinary life in an ordinary job, it is bullying,” said Nicolle Wallace, who was communications director for President George W. Bush and a top strategist to other Republicans. “It is cyberbullying. This is a strategy to bully somebody who dissents. That’s what is dark and disturbing.”   read more

Many Smartphone Health Apps Fail to Warn Users of Danger

"The state of health apps is even worse than we thought," said Dr. James Madara, chief executive of the American Medical Association. Perhaps most concerning was what happened when doctor reviewers entered information that should have drawn warnings from the app — like selecting "yes" when the app asked if the user was feeling suicidal, or entering extremely abnormal levels for blood sugar levels. "The vast majority of apps do not have any kind of response," said lead study author Singh.   read more

Trump D.C. Hotel Bookings by Foreign Envoys and Special Interest Groups Raise Alarm among Ethics Experts

The Trump International Hotel has come under scrutiny by government ethics experts who worry that foreign governments, special interest groups and others will book rooms and events there to curry favor with the president-elect. About 100 foreign diplomats from around the world used the hotel for a reception just a week after the election. Since the election, government ethics experts have called for the Trump Organization to sell its interest in the hotel.   read more

Refuted Breast Cancer Link Cited by Texas in Its Warning to Women Seeking Abortion

Since 2003, state law has mandated that pregnant women be provided information when mulling an abortion. The Texas Department of State Health Services issued the new edition of "A Woman's Right to Know" on Monday. The new edition of the booklet contains a section titled "Breast Cancer Risk," despite numerous, peer-reviewed studies that have refuted links between abortion and breast cancer. The booklet also says women who terminate pregnancies can become suicidal and infertile.   read more

NYPD Secrecy on Police Disciplinary Records Challenged in Court

The lawsuit is the latest salvo in a continuing dispute led by civil rights groups over transparency in how the NYPD holds officers accountable for misconduct. The lawsuit calls for release of disciplinary actions taken against police officers. “There is no excuse for New York City to be taking steps backwards on police transparency,” said CUPR's Monifa Bandele. “It leaves communities most impacted by police abuses and misconduct at further risk and without accountability from the NYPD.”   read more
49 to 64 of about 4787 News
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Controversies

49 to 64 of about 4787 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 300 Next

U.S. Teens Slipping in Math Proficiency, Stagnant in Science and Reading

American students have a math problem. "We're losing ground — a troubling prospect when, in today's knowledge-based economy, the best jobs can go anywhere in the world," said Education Secretary John B. King Jr. The PISA study is the latest to document that American students are underperforming their peers in several Asian nations. "Everything is just going down," said Peggy Carr, acting commissioner at the National Center for Education Statistics.   read more

Killing of Truck Safety Rules by GOP Lawmakers Portends Broad Rollback of Transportation Safety Regulations

Republican lawmakers effectively blocked Obama safety rules aimed at keeping tired truckers off the highway. But there's more coming down the road. American Trucking is pledging to come back next month, when Republicans are in control, and try to block state laws that require additional rest breaks for truckers beyond what federal rules require. The group says there should be one national rule on work hours for interstate truckers and that the extra breaks aren't necessary for safety.   read more

After 3 Years, New York’s Promise to Videotape Criminal Interrogations Remains Unfulfilled

Recording interrogations is a way to know whether police can be confident in the confessions that result. City officials say that 5,000 interrogations have been recorded, and that every detective bureau now has the equipment. But two judges testified that they had seen few cases in which the interrogations — as opposed to the confessions — were recorded. “One can speculate that some old-fashioned detectives may not want to have their methods on video as it might embarrass them,” said Dwyer.   read more

Record 50,000 U.S. Drug Overdose Deaths in 2015

Deaths from synthetic opioids, including illicit fentanyl, rose 73 percent to 9,580. And prescription painkillers took the highest toll, but posted the smallest increase. Abuse of drugs like Oxycontin and Vicodin killed 17,536, an increase of 4 percent. "I don't think we've ever seen anything like this. Certainly not in modern times," said Robert Anderson, who oversees death statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   read more

Libraries Become Unexpected Sites of Hate Crimes

Inside a book about the Quran, someone had written “lies cover to cover,” drawn a swastika and made a disparaging remark about the Prophet Muhammad. Six more books about Islam and the Quran that had been similarly defaced with racist language and imagery. Authorities say the spate of hate crimes targeting libraries, their books or patrons had rarely seen before. These crimes coincide with a recent FBI report that attacks against American Muslims surged last year.   read more

Big Business Warns Trump of Damage to Economy from Mass Deportations

Business groups note that experts predict negative economic fallout should Trump pursue mass deportation. A study by right-leaning American Action Network found that such a plan could reduce "real GDP by $1 trillion" and cost taxpayers more than $400 billion. Public opinion appears to be on their side. One survey found that 60% of Trump backers said immigrants in the country illegally should be able to stay. A third of Trump supporters said law enforcement should deport all such immigrants.   read more

Disbelief in New Mexico’s Rape Victims, Resulting in a Thousand Untested Rape Kits, May Discourage Victim Reporting

New Mexico leads the nation with a backlog of 5,000 untested evidence kits from sexual assaults. Audit officer Sarita Nair said the "heartbreaking" statistics reinforce the concerns of sex assault victims who are reluctant to come forward for fear of not being believed. "When we see a kit on a shelf and the reason is a lack of perceived victim credibility, we're just sort of reinforcing those worst fears and we're discouraging people from coming forward — and that just has to stop," she said.   read more

Surgeon General Sounds Warning on Widespread Use of E-Cigarettes by Nation’s Youth

Soaring use of e-cigarettes among young people “is now a major public health concern,” according to the surgeon general. The report from the nation’s highest public-health authority finds that e-cigarettes are now the most commonly used tobacco product among youths, surpassing tobacco cigarettes. E-cigarettes, which turn nicotine into inhalable vapor, can harm developing brains of teenagers who use them and also can create harmful aerosol for people around the user.   read more

California Lawmakers to Enact Sweeping Laws to Resist Trump’s Mass Immigrant Deportation Threats

“Throughout the presidential campaign and since, the president-elect has made many troubling statements that run counter to the principles that define California today,” said Kevin de León, the state Senate president pro tempore, “If the president-elect has identified 2 to 3 million criminal immigrants, we can only assume it’s a pretense to open up criteria to deport mothers who are pulled over for a broken taillight. We want to ensure that those facing deportation are afforded due process...”   read more

Decades-Long Trend of Rising Life Expectancy in U.S. Undergoes Mysterious Reversal

Popular theories for the cause of the decline, including an increase in obesity rates and an opiod epidemic, fail to explain a problem that feels broader. “If you actually dissect the data, neither of those arguments hold,” said Muennig. “This report slams it home that this is really a mystery.” Researchers suspect that the strain of income inequality in the U.S. -- and the stress that this causes — could be a major contributing factor to the uptick, but it has been hard to prove.   read more

Mass Deportations Damage U.S. Housing Market by Exacerbating Foreclosures

These findings reveal the spiraling and often unseen effects of mass deportations, a point that is no longer purely academic as Donald Trump weighs whether to make good on his campaign promise to deport millions of unauthorized immigrants. Previous research suggests that Hispanic households, like black ones, were disproportionately victimized by subprime lending schemes. But the fact that foreclosure rates among Hispanics surpassed those among blacks points to something else going on.   read more

Trump’s Cyberbullying of Union Boss Called “Dark and Disturbing” Assault on Right to Dissent

With the full power of the presidency just weeks away, Trump’s decision to single out Jones for ridicule has drawn condemnation from historians and White House veterans. “When you attack a man for living an ordinary life in an ordinary job, it is bullying,” said Nicolle Wallace, who was communications director for President George W. Bush and a top strategist to other Republicans. “It is cyberbullying. This is a strategy to bully somebody who dissents. That’s what is dark and disturbing.”   read more

Many Smartphone Health Apps Fail to Warn Users of Danger

"The state of health apps is even worse than we thought," said Dr. James Madara, chief executive of the American Medical Association. Perhaps most concerning was what happened when doctor reviewers entered information that should have drawn warnings from the app — like selecting "yes" when the app asked if the user was feeling suicidal, or entering extremely abnormal levels for blood sugar levels. "The vast majority of apps do not have any kind of response," said lead study author Singh.   read more

Trump D.C. Hotel Bookings by Foreign Envoys and Special Interest Groups Raise Alarm among Ethics Experts

The Trump International Hotel has come under scrutiny by government ethics experts who worry that foreign governments, special interest groups and others will book rooms and events there to curry favor with the president-elect. About 100 foreign diplomats from around the world used the hotel for a reception just a week after the election. Since the election, government ethics experts have called for the Trump Organization to sell its interest in the hotel.   read more

Refuted Breast Cancer Link Cited by Texas in Its Warning to Women Seeking Abortion

Since 2003, state law has mandated that pregnant women be provided information when mulling an abortion. The Texas Department of State Health Services issued the new edition of "A Woman's Right to Know" on Monday. The new edition of the booklet contains a section titled "Breast Cancer Risk," despite numerous, peer-reviewed studies that have refuted links between abortion and breast cancer. The booklet also says women who terminate pregnancies can become suicidal and infertile.   read more

NYPD Secrecy on Police Disciplinary Records Challenged in Court

The lawsuit is the latest salvo in a continuing dispute led by civil rights groups over transparency in how the NYPD holds officers accountable for misconduct. The lawsuit calls for release of disciplinary actions taken against police officers. “There is no excuse for New York City to be taking steps backwards on police transparency,” said CUPR's Monifa Bandele. “It leaves communities most impacted by police abuses and misconduct at further risk and without accountability from the NYPD.”   read more
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