U.S. and the World

1777 to 1792 of about 1850 News
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Suicide and “Dog Poop Girl” Lead to Clash Between Google and South Korean Government

Cyber-bullying that led to the suicide of an actress and the fleeing of “dog poop girl” from her hometown provided impetus for a new Cyber Defamation Law in South Korea requiring that the real name of a user be published with any of the user’s upl...   read more

Robot Wars Good for Soldiers, Bad for Civilians

The growing use of robots by the U.S. military to reduce battlefield casualties is coming at the expense of civilians, and it could have ramifications as well for the ability of the government to sell future wars to the American people. In 2008, t...   read more

Roxana Saberi Update: 8 Years in Prison

Roxana Saberi, an Iranian-American accused of spying on behalf of the United States, was sentenced to eight years in prison over the weekend by a secret tribunal in Iran. Saberi’s sentence was the most severe of those handed down by Iran’s judicia...   read more

African First Ladies Do Hollywood

On Monday, the first ladies of fifteen African nations will gather in Beverly Hills for The African First Ladies Summit and Gala— a two-day meeting (April 20-21) that will focus on combating HIV/AIDs and will also address women’s issues. They will...   read more

First Foreigner to be Prosecuted in the U.S. for Crimes in Iraq

Wesam al-Delaema, a 36-year-old Iraqi-born citizen of the Netherlands, became the first Iraq war insurgent to be prosecuted in an American court on Thursday, receiving a 25-year sentence for plotting to kill US soldiers. But al-Delaema will not se...   read more

Cuba Prepares for American Tourists…Again

As President Barack Obama arrives in Trinidad for the Fifth Summit of the Americas, one of the key issues to be discussed will be the 47-year-old U.S. embargo of Cuba. Despite the fact that Americans are legally banned from visiting Cuba, there is...   read more

U.S. Journalist Is Being Tried Behind Closed Doors in Iran

The secret trial of freelance journalist Roxana Saberi, an Iranian-American arrested in Tehran in January, began on Monday. Charged with spying for the United States, Saberi went to Iran six years ago, filing reports for the BBC and National Publi...   read more

Italian Nuclear Waste to be Dumped in Utah

A uranium isotope is a uranium isotope, regardless of its country of origin. But for two Democratic congressmen, there’s a problem with low-level nuclear waste from Italy being dumped in Utah, even though plenty of radioactive refuse has already b...   read more

Commodity Market Strong…For Cocaine

The Bush administration insisted its anti-drug efforts by federal law enforcement were succeeding because of reported spikes in the price of cocaine—an indicator that counter-narcotics raids were causing a shortage in the drug market. But the Wash...   read more

How to be a Successful Pirate: Rich Galen

In light of last week’s media maelstrom over Somali pirates capturing a American sea captain, GOP operative Rich Galen decided it was time to review some key rules for the modern-day privateer to follow:   Rule #1: If you’re going to take hostag...   read more

Obama Takes up the White Man’s Burden: Eric Margolis

A little more than a century ago, when the United States was just beginning to take its first steps toward becoming a world power, Rudyard Kipling’s poem, “The White Man’s Burden,” became all the rage in political circles. The poem captured the mi...   read more

Pirates Currently Hold 260 Hostages

Lost in all the celebratory coverage of an American merchant captain’s rescue by Navy SEALS is the fact that 17 ships and approximately 260 hostages are still being held by pirates from Somalia. While the United States took umbrage over the captur...   read more

Saudi Arabia Bans USA License Plate, Allows Marriage of 8-Year-Old

In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, a man cannot drive a car with “USA” on his license plate—but he can marry pre-pubescent girls, according to separate media reports coming out of the Middle East country. The restriction on automobile license plates ...   read more

75-Year-Old Professor Beaten as China Prepares for Tiananmen Anniversary

As the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre approaches, the Chinese government has launched a public relations campaign claiming that the human rights situation China will soon improve. However, actions speak louder than words. Last w...   read more

More Health Risks from China

Household problems ranging from corroded plumbing to serious skin rashes all are coming from the same source—China—according to experts in the United States and in other countries. For many Americans living in as many as 100,000 new homes built du...   read more

Judge Rules Apartheid Victims Can Sue Ford, GM and IBM

Manhattan Federal District Judge Shira Scheindlin is allowing some claims against companies that allegedly did business with the racist South African government during the 1970s and 1980s to go forward.  More than a dozen lawsuits were initially f...   read more
1777 to 1792 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 110 111 112 113 114 ... 116 Next

U.S. and the World

1777 to 1792 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 110 111 112 113 114 ... 116 Next

Suicide and “Dog Poop Girl” Lead to Clash Between Google and South Korean Government

Cyber-bullying that led to the suicide of an actress and the fleeing of “dog poop girl” from her hometown provided impetus for a new Cyber Defamation Law in South Korea requiring that the real name of a user be published with any of the user’s upl...   read more

Robot Wars Good for Soldiers, Bad for Civilians

The growing use of robots by the U.S. military to reduce battlefield casualties is coming at the expense of civilians, and it could have ramifications as well for the ability of the government to sell future wars to the American people. In 2008, t...   read more

Roxana Saberi Update: 8 Years in Prison

Roxana Saberi, an Iranian-American accused of spying on behalf of the United States, was sentenced to eight years in prison over the weekend by a secret tribunal in Iran. Saberi’s sentence was the most severe of those handed down by Iran’s judicia...   read more

African First Ladies Do Hollywood

On Monday, the first ladies of fifteen African nations will gather in Beverly Hills for The African First Ladies Summit and Gala— a two-day meeting (April 20-21) that will focus on combating HIV/AIDs and will also address women’s issues. They will...   read more

First Foreigner to be Prosecuted in the U.S. for Crimes in Iraq

Wesam al-Delaema, a 36-year-old Iraqi-born citizen of the Netherlands, became the first Iraq war insurgent to be prosecuted in an American court on Thursday, receiving a 25-year sentence for plotting to kill US soldiers. But al-Delaema will not se...   read more

Cuba Prepares for American Tourists…Again

As President Barack Obama arrives in Trinidad for the Fifth Summit of the Americas, one of the key issues to be discussed will be the 47-year-old U.S. embargo of Cuba. Despite the fact that Americans are legally banned from visiting Cuba, there is...   read more

U.S. Journalist Is Being Tried Behind Closed Doors in Iran

The secret trial of freelance journalist Roxana Saberi, an Iranian-American arrested in Tehran in January, began on Monday. Charged with spying for the United States, Saberi went to Iran six years ago, filing reports for the BBC and National Publi...   read more

Italian Nuclear Waste to be Dumped in Utah

A uranium isotope is a uranium isotope, regardless of its country of origin. But for two Democratic congressmen, there’s a problem with low-level nuclear waste from Italy being dumped in Utah, even though plenty of radioactive refuse has already b...   read more

Commodity Market Strong…For Cocaine

The Bush administration insisted its anti-drug efforts by federal law enforcement were succeeding because of reported spikes in the price of cocaine—an indicator that counter-narcotics raids were causing a shortage in the drug market. But the Wash...   read more

How to be a Successful Pirate: Rich Galen

In light of last week’s media maelstrom over Somali pirates capturing a American sea captain, GOP operative Rich Galen decided it was time to review some key rules for the modern-day privateer to follow:   Rule #1: If you’re going to take hostag...   read more

Obama Takes up the White Man’s Burden: Eric Margolis

A little more than a century ago, when the United States was just beginning to take its first steps toward becoming a world power, Rudyard Kipling’s poem, “The White Man’s Burden,” became all the rage in political circles. The poem captured the mi...   read more

Pirates Currently Hold 260 Hostages

Lost in all the celebratory coverage of an American merchant captain’s rescue by Navy SEALS is the fact that 17 ships and approximately 260 hostages are still being held by pirates from Somalia. While the United States took umbrage over the captur...   read more

Saudi Arabia Bans USA License Plate, Allows Marriage of 8-Year-Old

In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, a man cannot drive a car with “USA” on his license plate—but he can marry pre-pubescent girls, according to separate media reports coming out of the Middle East country. The restriction on automobile license plates ...   read more

75-Year-Old Professor Beaten as China Prepares for Tiananmen Anniversary

As the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre approaches, the Chinese government has launched a public relations campaign claiming that the human rights situation China will soon improve. However, actions speak louder than words. Last w...   read more

More Health Risks from China

Household problems ranging from corroded plumbing to serious skin rashes all are coming from the same source—China—according to experts in the United States and in other countries. For many Americans living in as many as 100,000 new homes built du...   read more

Judge Rules Apartheid Victims Can Sue Ford, GM and IBM

Manhattan Federal District Judge Shira Scheindlin is allowing some claims against companies that allegedly did business with the racist South African government during the 1970s and 1980s to go forward.  More than a dozen lawsuits were initially f...   read more
1777 to 1792 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 110 111 112 113 114 ... 116 Next