U.S. and the World

49 to 64 of about 1850 News
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India College Chain’s Expansion into U.S. Draws Opposition from Massachusetts Officials over Quality of Education

Its founder president, Ashok Chauhan, was charged with fraud in the 1990s by authorities in Germany, where he ran a network of companies. He returned to India and was never extradited. A plastics company in the U.S. also sued Chauhan in 1995 for failing to pay $20 million in debts. "They are a subsidiary of a conglomerate of companies," said Barmak Nassirian of the American Association of State College and Universities. "This is by no means reassuring, if you ask me."   read more

U.S. and 190 Nations Adopt Climate Plan to Offset Jet Emissions from International Flights

The aviation measure will be voluntary for the first six years, and even countries that commit to it voluntarily will be allowed to opt out on relatively short notice. Some environmental groups said the plan did not go far enough, forecasting that it would fall short of the goal originally set by the aviation organization to offset all of the growth in emissions from air travel after 2020. The measure also exempts many smaller countries that do not have large international air carriers.   read more

For First Time, A U.S. Court Serves a Lawsuit by Tweet

Al-Ajmi, who was blacklisted as a financer of terror by the U.S. and UN, has organized Twitter campaigns to help fund ISIS's systematic murder and displacement of Assyrian Christians, according to the lawsuit. Because Kuwait is not a signatory to the Hague Convention, St. Francis could not serve al-Ajmi through a centralized authority as it can in other nations. In her ruling, Judge Beeler granted the plaintiff's request to use an alternative method to serve al-Ajmi with the suit: Twitter.   read more

Federal Judge Shoots Down NRA Challenge to U.S. Ban on Elephant Trophy Imports

Defendant-intervenor Friends of Animals' legal director Michael Harris said, "This is an important victory for African elephants." The species "has taken a huge loss this past year, largely due to poor conservation management practices. Zimbabwe is one of the worst wildlife managers on earth," he added. "It is about time the United States took action to protect these elephants from Americans seeking to take advantage of Zimbabwe's poor conservation practices in order to take a blood trophy."   read more

Identities of Foreign Military Leaders Enrolled in Controversial U.S. Army School May Be Kept Secret, Rules Court

WHINSEC trains foreign military leaders on U.S. Army doctrine, with courses on intelligence and command. But some past attendees used their training to commit atrocities in their home nations. Judge Ikuta wrote: "Because disclosing the names of WHINSEC students and instructors would give rise to a 'clearly unwarranted' invasion of privacy, those names are therefore exempt from disclosure..." In his dissent, Judge Watford said that protecting identities takes a back seat to public interest.   read more

Court Rejects Gov. Pence’s Policy Barring Syrian Refugees from Indiana

"Nightmare speculation" does not justify a policy meant to keep out Syrian refugees, the court ruled Monday. Gov. Mike Pence had adopted the policy, vowing not to let any refugees fleeing the Syrian Civil War into his state. States have no power to suspend grants of asylum, however, so Pence instead ordered state agencies to withhold federal grant money from local resettlement agencies that provide refugees with social services. Meanwhile, Donald Trump picked Pence as his running mate.   read more

U.S. Removed as Overseer of Internet Domain Names

The U.S. government is no longer responsible for stewardship of internet-management functions, a move that internet-freedom advocates championed as essential to tamping down the misperception of the U.S. as the internet's overlord. Advocates of the transition said keeping the U.S. in its management role would have given countries like China, which censors online criticism of its government, an excuse to divide its networks from the web and crack down more deeply on its citizens' online conduct.   read more

White House Transcript Becomes Diplomatic Misstep

The White House rushed Friday to correct a diplomatic blooper after an official transcript listed Jerusalem as part of Israels. The mix-up came in a transcript of President Barack Obama's eulogy at the funeral for former Israeli President Shimon Peres. The White House press office routinely issues transcripts of Obama's speeches and includes the location of the speech at the top. A transcript released shortly after the funeral listed the location as "Jerusalem, Israel."   read more

More Measures Needed to Slow Global Warming

Six scientists who were leaders in past international climate conferences joined with the Universal Ecological Fund in Argentina to release a brief report Thursday, saying that if even more cuts in heat-trapping gases aren’t agreed upon soon, the world will warm by another 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) by around 2050.   read more

Study Finds Police Use of Body Cameras Dramatically Cuts Complaints

A Cambridge University study of British and U.S. police shows a 93% decrease in the number of complaints made against officers when they are using body cameras — pivotal findings that suggest the simple devices could reduce conflicts between police and the public. The idea behind the study is simple: people who are being observed — and know it — change their behavior. Researchers suggested that cameras encourage best behavior on the part of both the officers and the public.   read more

U.S. Senate Passes Bill to Combat Lucrative Illegal Wildlife Trafficking Trade

Coons said he was disturbed by reports that African elephant population has shrunk by 30% since 2007, primarily due to poaching. "Not only are iconic wildlife species in grave danger of disappearing, but wildlife trafficking also fuels well-organized criminal networks," he said. "Imperiled animals are slaughtered for no reason other than money, and innocent human lives are lost in the process. We cannot wait any longer to use every tool at our disposal to curb this global crisis."   read more

Former Japanese Leader Heads Fundraising Effort for Ailing U.S. Sailors Who Aided Fukushima Relief

"I felt I had to do something to help those who worked so hard for Japan," said the prime minister. "Maybe this isn't enough, but it will express our gratitude, that Japan is thankful." Sailors became sick with cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors, and they blame radiation. Their ships were in the direction of the radioactive plumes spewed from the Fukushima plant. Aircraft carriers routinely use drinking water from the ocean, which the lawsuit says was contaminated with radiation.   read more

U.S. Wildlife Officials Burn $1 Million Worth of Rhino Horns in Symbolic Ceremony against Poaching

Federal wildlife officials burned more than $1 million worth of rhino horn items in a ceremony Thursday, as they and onlookers raged over continued poaching and trafficking of the endangered animals. The items--whole horns and ornate objects--had been confiscated by U.S. officials before being used in the symbolic event — the first of its kind in the nation. "Wildlife trafficking through the United States, or into the United States, will not be tolerated," said Wildlife Service's Michelle Gadd.   read more

Olympics: If African-American Women were a Nation, They’d be in 6th Place

African-American women earned gold medals in 15 events (including participation in team sports) at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. If they had been a nation, they would have been in sixth place. This despite with a population of about 19.6 million, they would be only the 67th most populous nation in the world.   read more

Lawsuit Seeks to Block Energy Dept.’s Huge Nuclear Waste Transport from Canada to U.S.

The Energy Dept's unprecedented proposed transfer of "a toxic liquid stew" containing nuclear waste between Canada and the U.S violates federal law, seven environmental groups claim in court. The proposed $60 million deal would see more than 6,000 gallons of the liquid waste transported more than 1,100 miles. "The radioactive waste byproducts...are acknowledged to be among the most radioactively hazardous materials on Earth," the complaint states.   read more

VW Payout to Deceived American VW Owners: $15 Billion; Payout to European Owners: $0

VW owners in the U.S. will receive about $20,000 per car as compensation for the company’s diesel deception. VW owners in Europe at most get a software update and a short length of plastic tubing. “Why are they getting so much and we’re getting nothing?” Franz said of U.S. owners. The startling gap in treatment is the result of European laws that shield corporations from class action suits brought by unhappy consumers.   read more
49 to 64 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 116 Next

U.S. and the World

49 to 64 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 116 Next

India College Chain’s Expansion into U.S. Draws Opposition from Massachusetts Officials over Quality of Education

Its founder president, Ashok Chauhan, was charged with fraud in the 1990s by authorities in Germany, where he ran a network of companies. He returned to India and was never extradited. A plastics company in the U.S. also sued Chauhan in 1995 for failing to pay $20 million in debts. "They are a subsidiary of a conglomerate of companies," said Barmak Nassirian of the American Association of State College and Universities. "This is by no means reassuring, if you ask me."   read more

U.S. and 190 Nations Adopt Climate Plan to Offset Jet Emissions from International Flights

The aviation measure will be voluntary for the first six years, and even countries that commit to it voluntarily will be allowed to opt out on relatively short notice. Some environmental groups said the plan did not go far enough, forecasting that it would fall short of the goal originally set by the aviation organization to offset all of the growth in emissions from air travel after 2020. The measure also exempts many smaller countries that do not have large international air carriers.   read more

For First Time, A U.S. Court Serves a Lawsuit by Tweet

Al-Ajmi, who was blacklisted as a financer of terror by the U.S. and UN, has organized Twitter campaigns to help fund ISIS's systematic murder and displacement of Assyrian Christians, according to the lawsuit. Because Kuwait is not a signatory to the Hague Convention, St. Francis could not serve al-Ajmi through a centralized authority as it can in other nations. In her ruling, Judge Beeler granted the plaintiff's request to use an alternative method to serve al-Ajmi with the suit: Twitter.   read more

Federal Judge Shoots Down NRA Challenge to U.S. Ban on Elephant Trophy Imports

Defendant-intervenor Friends of Animals' legal director Michael Harris said, "This is an important victory for African elephants." The species "has taken a huge loss this past year, largely due to poor conservation management practices. Zimbabwe is one of the worst wildlife managers on earth," he added. "It is about time the United States took action to protect these elephants from Americans seeking to take advantage of Zimbabwe's poor conservation practices in order to take a blood trophy."   read more

Identities of Foreign Military Leaders Enrolled in Controversial U.S. Army School May Be Kept Secret, Rules Court

WHINSEC trains foreign military leaders on U.S. Army doctrine, with courses on intelligence and command. But some past attendees used their training to commit atrocities in their home nations. Judge Ikuta wrote: "Because disclosing the names of WHINSEC students and instructors would give rise to a 'clearly unwarranted' invasion of privacy, those names are therefore exempt from disclosure..." In his dissent, Judge Watford said that protecting identities takes a back seat to public interest.   read more

Court Rejects Gov. Pence’s Policy Barring Syrian Refugees from Indiana

"Nightmare speculation" does not justify a policy meant to keep out Syrian refugees, the court ruled Monday. Gov. Mike Pence had adopted the policy, vowing not to let any refugees fleeing the Syrian Civil War into his state. States have no power to suspend grants of asylum, however, so Pence instead ordered state agencies to withhold federal grant money from local resettlement agencies that provide refugees with social services. Meanwhile, Donald Trump picked Pence as his running mate.   read more

U.S. Removed as Overseer of Internet Domain Names

The U.S. government is no longer responsible for stewardship of internet-management functions, a move that internet-freedom advocates championed as essential to tamping down the misperception of the U.S. as the internet's overlord. Advocates of the transition said keeping the U.S. in its management role would have given countries like China, which censors online criticism of its government, an excuse to divide its networks from the web and crack down more deeply on its citizens' online conduct.   read more

White House Transcript Becomes Diplomatic Misstep

The White House rushed Friday to correct a diplomatic blooper after an official transcript listed Jerusalem as part of Israels. The mix-up came in a transcript of President Barack Obama's eulogy at the funeral for former Israeli President Shimon Peres. The White House press office routinely issues transcripts of Obama's speeches and includes the location of the speech at the top. A transcript released shortly after the funeral listed the location as "Jerusalem, Israel."   read more

More Measures Needed to Slow Global Warming

Six scientists who were leaders in past international climate conferences joined with the Universal Ecological Fund in Argentina to release a brief report Thursday, saying that if even more cuts in heat-trapping gases aren’t agreed upon soon, the world will warm by another 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) by around 2050.   read more

Study Finds Police Use of Body Cameras Dramatically Cuts Complaints

A Cambridge University study of British and U.S. police shows a 93% decrease in the number of complaints made against officers when they are using body cameras — pivotal findings that suggest the simple devices could reduce conflicts between police and the public. The idea behind the study is simple: people who are being observed — and know it — change their behavior. Researchers suggested that cameras encourage best behavior on the part of both the officers and the public.   read more

U.S. Senate Passes Bill to Combat Lucrative Illegal Wildlife Trafficking Trade

Coons said he was disturbed by reports that African elephant population has shrunk by 30% since 2007, primarily due to poaching. "Not only are iconic wildlife species in grave danger of disappearing, but wildlife trafficking also fuels well-organized criminal networks," he said. "Imperiled animals are slaughtered for no reason other than money, and innocent human lives are lost in the process. We cannot wait any longer to use every tool at our disposal to curb this global crisis."   read more

Former Japanese Leader Heads Fundraising Effort for Ailing U.S. Sailors Who Aided Fukushima Relief

"I felt I had to do something to help those who worked so hard for Japan," said the prime minister. "Maybe this isn't enough, but it will express our gratitude, that Japan is thankful." Sailors became sick with cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors, and they blame radiation. Their ships were in the direction of the radioactive plumes spewed from the Fukushima plant. Aircraft carriers routinely use drinking water from the ocean, which the lawsuit says was contaminated with radiation.   read more

U.S. Wildlife Officials Burn $1 Million Worth of Rhino Horns in Symbolic Ceremony against Poaching

Federal wildlife officials burned more than $1 million worth of rhino horn items in a ceremony Thursday, as they and onlookers raged over continued poaching and trafficking of the endangered animals. The items--whole horns and ornate objects--had been confiscated by U.S. officials before being used in the symbolic event — the first of its kind in the nation. "Wildlife trafficking through the United States, or into the United States, will not be tolerated," said Wildlife Service's Michelle Gadd.   read more

Olympics: If African-American Women were a Nation, They’d be in 6th Place

African-American women earned gold medals in 15 events (including participation in team sports) at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. If they had been a nation, they would have been in sixth place. This despite with a population of about 19.6 million, they would be only the 67th most populous nation in the world.   read more

Lawsuit Seeks to Block Energy Dept.’s Huge Nuclear Waste Transport from Canada to U.S.

The Energy Dept's unprecedented proposed transfer of "a toxic liquid stew" containing nuclear waste between Canada and the U.S violates federal law, seven environmental groups claim in court. The proposed $60 million deal would see more than 6,000 gallons of the liquid waste transported more than 1,100 miles. "The radioactive waste byproducts...are acknowledged to be among the most radioactively hazardous materials on Earth," the complaint states.   read more

VW Payout to Deceived American VW Owners: $15 Billion; Payout to European Owners: $0

VW owners in the U.S. will receive about $20,000 per car as compensation for the company’s diesel deception. VW owners in Europe at most get a software update and a short length of plastic tubing. “Why are they getting so much and we’re getting nothing?” Franz said of U.S. owners. The startling gap in treatment is the result of European laws that shield corporations from class action suits brought by unhappy consumers.   read more
49 to 64 of about 1850 News
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