U.S. and the World

81 to 96 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 ... 116 Next

Warning for Arabs Traveling in U.S.

The United Arab Emirates warned its citizens on Sunday to avoid wearing traditional clothing when traveling abroad, apparently in response to an episode in Ohio last week in which a businessman from Abu Dhabi, dressed in robes and a head scarf, was confronted by the police at gunpoint because a hotel clerk thought he might be a terrorist. Police videos showed officers drawing and cocking rifles. One officer could be heard saying, “There he is!” Another shouted, “Get on the ground!”   read more

EU to Allow Sale of Roundup Herbicide an Extra 18 Months

The European Commission said Wednesday that it has no choice but to extend approval of the herbicide glyphosate through 2017, after EU member states failed to either approve or ban the chemical. The European Union’s current approval of glyphosate was set to expire on June 30. However, a lack of consensus left the commission with a single choice as the EU’s executive body: extend glyphosate’s license for another 18 months in hopes that the member states will make a unified decision.   read more

Lawsuit against U.S. Health Agency Alleges Religious Charities it Funds Deny Health Options to Raped Refugee Girls

Religious charities get millions of dollars of federal money to detain young, unaccompanied immigrants but deny them health services even if they have been raped, and punish them for asking for reproductive health care, claims the ACLU. The lawsuit tells of four young pregnant women, two of whom were raped on their journey to the U.S.. They were unable to get contraception or abortion through their detainers and had to be transferred to different states, away from the few friends they had.   read more

Central American Refugees’ Lives Put at Risk by U.S.-Financed Program for their Interception and Deportation by Mexico

Obama and Peña Nieto have cooperated to intercept desperate Central American refugees in Mexico before they can reach the U.S. border. These refugees are then typically deported to their home countries — which can be a death sentence. In effect, we have pressured and bribed Mexico to do our dirty work, detaining and deporting people fleeing gangs in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. This solved a political crisis that Obama faced, but it betrays some of the world’s most vulnerable people.   read more

Afghanistan’s Taliban, Not Terrorists, Are Now Main Target of Heavy U.S. Drone Strikes

The investigation revealed that more than 200 strikes, most by drones, have been conducted to defend ground forces battling a rising insurgency, despite the fact that combat missions came to an end in 2014. These strikes represent more than 60% of all US airstrikes in the country. This suggests the US has been drawn quietly yet significantly into fighting the Taliban-led insurgency. Washington has appeared to make its airwar against the Taliban official by relaxing its rules in Afghanistan.   read more

50 Years after Unexploded Hydrogen Bombs Landed on Spanish Village, U.S. Secrecy Plagues Cancer-Stricken Air Force Crew Sent to Clean It Up

It was one of the biggest nuclear accidents in history, and the U.S. wanted it cleaned up quickly and quietly. The Air Force told the men sent to clean up the spilled radioactive material: “Don’t worry.” “There was no talk about radiation...” said Frank Thompson, who spent days searching the contaminated fields. “They told us it was safe, and we were dumb enough, I guess, to believe them.” Thompson now has cancer in his liver, lung and kidney. Yet the Air Force still insists it was safe.   read more

In Wake of U.S. Military Crimes, Thousands of Japanese Call for Removal of U.S. Bases in Biggest Protest in Two Decades

Organizers said 65,000 people had attended the protest. That would make it the largest demonstration since 1995, when two American Marines and a Navy sailor were arrested over the rape of a 12-year-old girl, an episode that shook the tight military alliance between the United States and Japan and is still bitterly remembered by many Okinawans. “Vicious crimes cannot be tolerated,” the governor of Okinawa, Takeshi Onaga, said at the rally.   read more

Pentagon Finds 42% of Afghans Feel Less Secure Now than Before U.S. Invasion

Afghans feel less secure than at any recent time as Afghan battlefield deaths continue to escalate and civilian casualties hit a record high. Afghan civilian casualties in 2015 hit the highest level since the U.N. group began systematic documentation in 2009. "As fighting and suicide attacks have increased in more populated areas, the number of women and children included among the civilian casualties has also increased," the report said.   read more

Judge Derails Texas Effort to Block U.S. Resettlement of Syrian Refugees

The judge said "it is highly improbable that Congress absentmindedly forgot to mention an intended private action" when it created a statutory scheme with express provisions for private enforcement in certain circumstances. Godbey had rejected Texas' motion to block more Syrian refugees. He concluded then the dispute is a political issue that is not up to the states or federal courts. Federal officials argued in January that Texas had failed to prove the refugees are a threat to the public.   read more

Supreme Court Says No to Birthright Citizenship for American Samoans

The Supreme Court has rejected an appeal from a group of American Samoans who say the United States should grant full citizenship to people born in the U.S. territory. The justices on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that said the constitutional guarantee of birthright citizenship does not extend to the islands that have been a part of the country since 1900.   read more

Number of Nuclear Warheads Drops, but Arsenals Are Being Modernized

The global number of nuclear warheads dropped last year, though none of the nine nuclear powers showed any signs of giving up their atomic weapons, an arms watchdog said Monday. In an annual report, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said the United States, Russia, Britain, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel and North Korea, together had about 15,395 nuclear weapons on Jan. 1 this year, down from 15,850 a year earlier.   read more

Outsourcing Victims Begin to Break Their Silence

While corporate executives have been outspoken in defending their labor practices before Congress and the public, the American workers who lost jobs to global outsourcing companies have been largely silent. Until recently. Now some of the workers who were displaced are starting to speak out, despite severance agreements prohibiting them from criticizing their former employers.   read more

Germans Stage Protest at U.S. Base Over Drone Flights

Demonstrators have formed a human chain near a U.S. air base in western Germany to protest against lethal drone strikes. Organizers estimated that about 5,000 people took part in the chain near the Ramstein Air Base on a rainy Saturday, while police put the number at some 2,000.   read more

U.S. Admiral Pleads Guilty in “Fat Leonard” Fraud Case

A Navy admiral on Thursday pleaded guilty to lying to federal authorities investigating a $34 million fraud scheme involving a Malaysian contractor known as “Fat Leonard” — becoming the highest-ranking military official to be taken down in the wide-spanning scandal. Rear Adm. Robert Gilbeau, 55, is believed to be the first active-duty naval flag officer to be charged in federal court.   read more

Tensions for U.S. Military in Japan Spike after Sailor’s DUI Crash, Prompting Navy Drinking Ban

The U.S. Navy imposed a drinking ban on its 19,000 personnel in Japan on Monday, ordering them confined to their bases after a sailor who was thought to have been drinking was arrested on the island of Okinawa in connection with a car accident that left two Japanese civilians injured. The accident occurred at a tense time for the U.S. military in Japan. U.S. forces on Okinawa were already under curfew after a Marine veteran was arrested last month in connection with the killing of a local woman.   read more

U.S. Bans Commercial Trade of Ivory Goods in Effort to Stem Slaughter of African Elephants

"Ivory looks best on its original owners. Killing elephants and hacking off their tusks enriches terrorists, robs Africa of one of its great revenue-generators, and denies future generations the opportunity to see these iconic creatures. This is the right policy on so many levels," said Humane Society CEO Wayne. The new rule, to be published on June 6, is also the latest action implementing the President's 2013 Executive Order to combat wildlife trafficking.   read more
81 to 96 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 ... 116 Next

U.S. and the World

81 to 96 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 ... 116 Next

Warning for Arabs Traveling in U.S.

The United Arab Emirates warned its citizens on Sunday to avoid wearing traditional clothing when traveling abroad, apparently in response to an episode in Ohio last week in which a businessman from Abu Dhabi, dressed in robes and a head scarf, was confronted by the police at gunpoint because a hotel clerk thought he might be a terrorist. Police videos showed officers drawing and cocking rifles. One officer could be heard saying, “There he is!” Another shouted, “Get on the ground!”   read more

EU to Allow Sale of Roundup Herbicide an Extra 18 Months

The European Commission said Wednesday that it has no choice but to extend approval of the herbicide glyphosate through 2017, after EU member states failed to either approve or ban the chemical. The European Union’s current approval of glyphosate was set to expire on June 30. However, a lack of consensus left the commission with a single choice as the EU’s executive body: extend glyphosate’s license for another 18 months in hopes that the member states will make a unified decision.   read more

Lawsuit against U.S. Health Agency Alleges Religious Charities it Funds Deny Health Options to Raped Refugee Girls

Religious charities get millions of dollars of federal money to detain young, unaccompanied immigrants but deny them health services even if they have been raped, and punish them for asking for reproductive health care, claims the ACLU. The lawsuit tells of four young pregnant women, two of whom were raped on their journey to the U.S.. They were unable to get contraception or abortion through their detainers and had to be transferred to different states, away from the few friends they had.   read more

Central American Refugees’ Lives Put at Risk by U.S.-Financed Program for their Interception and Deportation by Mexico

Obama and Peña Nieto have cooperated to intercept desperate Central American refugees in Mexico before they can reach the U.S. border. These refugees are then typically deported to their home countries — which can be a death sentence. In effect, we have pressured and bribed Mexico to do our dirty work, detaining and deporting people fleeing gangs in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. This solved a political crisis that Obama faced, but it betrays some of the world’s most vulnerable people.   read more

Afghanistan’s Taliban, Not Terrorists, Are Now Main Target of Heavy U.S. Drone Strikes

The investigation revealed that more than 200 strikes, most by drones, have been conducted to defend ground forces battling a rising insurgency, despite the fact that combat missions came to an end in 2014. These strikes represent more than 60% of all US airstrikes in the country. This suggests the US has been drawn quietly yet significantly into fighting the Taliban-led insurgency. Washington has appeared to make its airwar against the Taliban official by relaxing its rules in Afghanistan.   read more

50 Years after Unexploded Hydrogen Bombs Landed on Spanish Village, U.S. Secrecy Plagues Cancer-Stricken Air Force Crew Sent to Clean It Up

It was one of the biggest nuclear accidents in history, and the U.S. wanted it cleaned up quickly and quietly. The Air Force told the men sent to clean up the spilled radioactive material: “Don’t worry.” “There was no talk about radiation...” said Frank Thompson, who spent days searching the contaminated fields. “They told us it was safe, and we were dumb enough, I guess, to believe them.” Thompson now has cancer in his liver, lung and kidney. Yet the Air Force still insists it was safe.   read more

In Wake of U.S. Military Crimes, Thousands of Japanese Call for Removal of U.S. Bases in Biggest Protest in Two Decades

Organizers said 65,000 people had attended the protest. That would make it the largest demonstration since 1995, when two American Marines and a Navy sailor were arrested over the rape of a 12-year-old girl, an episode that shook the tight military alliance between the United States and Japan and is still bitterly remembered by many Okinawans. “Vicious crimes cannot be tolerated,” the governor of Okinawa, Takeshi Onaga, said at the rally.   read more

Pentagon Finds 42% of Afghans Feel Less Secure Now than Before U.S. Invasion

Afghans feel less secure than at any recent time as Afghan battlefield deaths continue to escalate and civilian casualties hit a record high. Afghan civilian casualties in 2015 hit the highest level since the U.N. group began systematic documentation in 2009. "As fighting and suicide attacks have increased in more populated areas, the number of women and children included among the civilian casualties has also increased," the report said.   read more

Judge Derails Texas Effort to Block U.S. Resettlement of Syrian Refugees

The judge said "it is highly improbable that Congress absentmindedly forgot to mention an intended private action" when it created a statutory scheme with express provisions for private enforcement in certain circumstances. Godbey had rejected Texas' motion to block more Syrian refugees. He concluded then the dispute is a political issue that is not up to the states or federal courts. Federal officials argued in January that Texas had failed to prove the refugees are a threat to the public.   read more

Supreme Court Says No to Birthright Citizenship for American Samoans

The Supreme Court has rejected an appeal from a group of American Samoans who say the United States should grant full citizenship to people born in the U.S. territory. The justices on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that said the constitutional guarantee of birthright citizenship does not extend to the islands that have been a part of the country since 1900.   read more

Number of Nuclear Warheads Drops, but Arsenals Are Being Modernized

The global number of nuclear warheads dropped last year, though none of the nine nuclear powers showed any signs of giving up their atomic weapons, an arms watchdog said Monday. In an annual report, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said the United States, Russia, Britain, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel and North Korea, together had about 15,395 nuclear weapons on Jan. 1 this year, down from 15,850 a year earlier.   read more

Outsourcing Victims Begin to Break Their Silence

While corporate executives have been outspoken in defending their labor practices before Congress and the public, the American workers who lost jobs to global outsourcing companies have been largely silent. Until recently. Now some of the workers who were displaced are starting to speak out, despite severance agreements prohibiting them from criticizing their former employers.   read more

Germans Stage Protest at U.S. Base Over Drone Flights

Demonstrators have formed a human chain near a U.S. air base in western Germany to protest against lethal drone strikes. Organizers estimated that about 5,000 people took part in the chain near the Ramstein Air Base on a rainy Saturday, while police put the number at some 2,000.   read more

U.S. Admiral Pleads Guilty in “Fat Leonard” Fraud Case

A Navy admiral on Thursday pleaded guilty to lying to federal authorities investigating a $34 million fraud scheme involving a Malaysian contractor known as “Fat Leonard” — becoming the highest-ranking military official to be taken down in the wide-spanning scandal. Rear Adm. Robert Gilbeau, 55, is believed to be the first active-duty naval flag officer to be charged in federal court.   read more

Tensions for U.S. Military in Japan Spike after Sailor’s DUI Crash, Prompting Navy Drinking Ban

The U.S. Navy imposed a drinking ban on its 19,000 personnel in Japan on Monday, ordering them confined to their bases after a sailor who was thought to have been drinking was arrested on the island of Okinawa in connection with a car accident that left two Japanese civilians injured. The accident occurred at a tense time for the U.S. military in Japan. U.S. forces on Okinawa were already under curfew after a Marine veteran was arrested last month in connection with the killing of a local woman.   read more

U.S. Bans Commercial Trade of Ivory Goods in Effort to Stem Slaughter of African Elephants

"Ivory looks best on its original owners. Killing elephants and hacking off their tusks enriches terrorists, robs Africa of one of its great revenue-generators, and denies future generations the opportunity to see these iconic creatures. This is the right policy on so many levels," said Humane Society CEO Wayne. The new rule, to be published on June 6, is also the latest action implementing the President's 2013 Executive Order to combat wildlife trafficking.   read more
81 to 96 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 ... 116 Next