Unusual News

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Growth of U.S. Latino Population Falls behind that of Asian Americans

Demographer William Frey said the slower growth is largely a factor of the economy. A slower economy is influencing families to hold off on having more children, and it's discouraging migration amid stronger border enforcement, he said. Kenneth M. Johnson, a senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy, said U.S. Hispanic women between the ages of 20 to 24 have seen a 36% decline in birth rates. "That's by far the largest decline of any other group," Johnson said.   read more

Newly Discovered Parasite is named after Barack Obama … And it’s an Honor

It's no Nobel Peace Prize, but Barack Obama has a new honor to brag about. Scientists have named a parasite after him — and there's no worming out of it. Meet Baracktrema obamai, a tiny parasitic flatworm that lives in turtles' blood. A new study officially names the 2-inch, hair-thin creature after Obama. Thomas Platt, the newly retired biology professor at Saint Mary's College in Indiana who chose the name, says it's an honor, not an insult. Really.   read more

Increasingly Polarizing Political Rhetoric Turns More Millennials into Independent Voters

The study found more young adults are open to conservative ideology. Twenge said it's surprising as these same young people generally disagree with many traditional conservative viewpoints. "Given young people's support for same-sex marriage and legalizing marijuana, it's surprising that more now identify as political conservatives. Overall, millennials may not be as reliably liberal and Democrat as many had predicted, especially as they are likely to grow more conservative as they get older."   read more

Obama Nominates First Muslim to be a Federal Judge

Muslim advocacy groups cheered Qureshi’s nomination. The issue of diversity in the judicial landscape received renewed attention this year after Donald Trump, the Republican nominee, said in May that Gonzalo P. Curiel, the presiding judge in a lawsuit filed by former Trump University students, would be biased against him because of the judge’s Mexican-American background. Trump later said that he did not think that a Muslim judge would be fair to him, either.   read more

FAA Issues Rare Warning for Passengers to Turn Off Exploding Samsung Smartphones during Flights

U.S. aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step late Thursday of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The FAA also warned passengers not to put the phones in their checked bags, citing "recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung." It's unusual for the FAA to warn passengers about a product. Samsung ordered a global recall after an investigation of explosions.   read more

Louisiana Judges Hand Out Longer Sentences when Local Football Team Loses in an Upset

“We calculate that each upset loss of the LSU football team generates excess punishments of juvenile defenders in Louisiana by a total of more than 1,332 days, including time in custody and probation,” Eren and Mocan wrote. “Importantly, 159 extra days of jail time has been assigned to juveniles convicted of a felony due to an upset loss in a football game.” Not surprisingly, African-American defendants bear the brunt of the judges’ unhappiness about the Tigers’ fortunes.   read more

When Investigators Realize Their Wiretap Has Mistakenly Uncovered a Different Crime, They Must Stop Listening, Rules Court

Imagine a scene straight out of an Alfred Hitchcock movie: You call a phone number, unaware that it has been wiretapped as part of a federal investigation, and incriminate yourself in a different crime altogether. Judge Gould noted the novelty of the question: Is the evidence admissible when a valid wiretap helps catch someone else who happens to be involved in a different crime? The government needs to stop listening to people's conversations when it knows it shouldn't, said Johnson.   read more

Politics of Employees are Strongly Influenced by Political Leanings of Their CEO

This election cycle, it seems that many CEOs have chosen to be less public about whom they are supporting in the presidential race. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich canceled an event at his home for Donald Trump after it was reported to be causing a firestorm among Intel employees. Some executives privately say they worry they could see reprisals against their business or industry if they were to actively campaign for one candidate or another.   read more

New FDA Tobacco Rules Bring End to Century-Old Tradition of Cigar Donations to U.S. Troops

Among the new FDA rules is a ban on the charitable donation of tobacco products. Van Trees runs Support the Troops, a nonprofit organization that sends care packages to bases in locations such as Afghanistan and Iraq. Cigars are the second-most-requested item in those packages, behind coffee and ahead of toothpaste and tube socks. "It means the world to these guys who love to sit by the fire and smoke some sticks," Van Trees said. "This is going to put a huge hole in what we do for them."   read more

Wildlife Service Unveils Plan to Protect At-Risk Species

The proposed policy responds to President Obama's November 2015 directive to key federal agencies to develop and share a "common set of their best practices to mitigate for harmful impacts to natural resources." While acknowledging that economic development, infrastructure, and national security goals are achieved at a price to our natural resources, the president's memorandum expressed his conviction that American ingenuity was up to the task of minimizing and compensating for those impacts.   read more

Atoning for Past, Georgetown University to Award Preferential Admission Status to Descendants of Slaves

“This community participated in the institution of slavery,” said Georgetown president DeGioia, addressing a crowd of hundreds of students, faculty members and descendants. “This original evil that shaped the early years of the Republic was present here. We have been able to hide from this truth, bury this truth, ignore and deny this truth. As a community and as individuals, we cannot do our best work if we refuse to take ownership of such a critical part of our history. We must acknowledge it.”   read more

From Websites to City Planning, Design Decisions Have Discriminatory Consequences

Discriminatory design and decision-making affects all aspects of our lives. Industrial design plays a role by steering human activities. For example, benches designed with prominent arm rests or shallow seats discourage homeless people from sleeping on them. This phenomenon is known as “hostile architecture." As one critic points out, it says a lot about a culture when its solution to homelessness is to put spikes on public surfaces.   read more

NBA Team Smartphone App Secretly Records Private Phone Conversations, Claims Lawsuit

Satchell says whenever the app is open, even running in the background, it turns on microphones in fans' smartphones and records them while scanning for audio signals to pinpoint their location for marketing purposes. "Her phone was present in locations and personal and private situations not generally accessible to the public where the expectation was that her conversations were to remain private," the complaint states.   read more

Heart Implant Devices Can Be Hacked to Steal Data or Harm Patients, Claims Lawsuit

In a class action that sounds like a Tom Clancy novel, a patient claims that implanted heart devices can be attacked by hackers. The security flaws not only put patients' information at risk, but the heart implants are vulnerable to attack "in ways previously not possible." For instance,someone could "modify the implant without necessarily being close to the victim," Ross says. "Such attacks can put at risk the safety of the patient with the implantable device, with fatal consequences..."   read more

Minnesota Limits Pesticides to Protect Bees

Bee expert Marla Spivak said the governor's order "puts Minnesota miles ahead of all the other states in our nation. ... Some may think that these actions go too far, but I honestly don't know a farmer, a nursery operator, a grower, a pesticide applicator that wants to kill a bee or monarch while they're controlling their crop pests." Said Gov. Dayton: "We're not trying to ban anybody's practices or businesses. but there's a lot more we can do...to protect the pollinators."   read more

Florida Man Struck by Lightning and Bitten by Rattle Snack, Python, Alligator and Poisonous Spider

Even before the latest incidents, Cook had many misadventures. He got bitten by an alligator that he "accidentally" caught while fishing. And he was bitten by his friend's Burmese python, which he was trying to feed. "It's been a rough four years," he said. "Maybe the higher up ... is trying to get your attention that maybe something is going wrong. Or maybe I've simply been in the wrong place at the wrong time my whole life." He is unemployed because the company fired him due to his absences.   read more
65 to 80 of about 1844 News
Prev 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... 116 Next

Unusual News

65 to 80 of about 1844 News
Prev 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... 116 Next

Growth of U.S. Latino Population Falls behind that of Asian Americans

Demographer William Frey said the slower growth is largely a factor of the economy. A slower economy is influencing families to hold off on having more children, and it's discouraging migration amid stronger border enforcement, he said. Kenneth M. Johnson, a senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy, said U.S. Hispanic women between the ages of 20 to 24 have seen a 36% decline in birth rates. "That's by far the largest decline of any other group," Johnson said.   read more

Newly Discovered Parasite is named after Barack Obama … And it’s an Honor

It's no Nobel Peace Prize, but Barack Obama has a new honor to brag about. Scientists have named a parasite after him — and there's no worming out of it. Meet Baracktrema obamai, a tiny parasitic flatworm that lives in turtles' blood. A new study officially names the 2-inch, hair-thin creature after Obama. Thomas Platt, the newly retired biology professor at Saint Mary's College in Indiana who chose the name, says it's an honor, not an insult. Really.   read more

Increasingly Polarizing Political Rhetoric Turns More Millennials into Independent Voters

The study found more young adults are open to conservative ideology. Twenge said it's surprising as these same young people generally disagree with many traditional conservative viewpoints. "Given young people's support for same-sex marriage and legalizing marijuana, it's surprising that more now identify as political conservatives. Overall, millennials may not be as reliably liberal and Democrat as many had predicted, especially as they are likely to grow more conservative as they get older."   read more

Obama Nominates First Muslim to be a Federal Judge

Muslim advocacy groups cheered Qureshi’s nomination. The issue of diversity in the judicial landscape received renewed attention this year after Donald Trump, the Republican nominee, said in May that Gonzalo P. Curiel, the presiding judge in a lawsuit filed by former Trump University students, would be biased against him because of the judge’s Mexican-American background. Trump later said that he did not think that a Muslim judge would be fair to him, either.   read more

FAA Issues Rare Warning for Passengers to Turn Off Exploding Samsung Smartphones during Flights

U.S. aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step late Thursday of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The FAA also warned passengers not to put the phones in their checked bags, citing "recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung." It's unusual for the FAA to warn passengers about a product. Samsung ordered a global recall after an investigation of explosions.   read more

Louisiana Judges Hand Out Longer Sentences when Local Football Team Loses in an Upset

“We calculate that each upset loss of the LSU football team generates excess punishments of juvenile defenders in Louisiana by a total of more than 1,332 days, including time in custody and probation,” Eren and Mocan wrote. “Importantly, 159 extra days of jail time has been assigned to juveniles convicted of a felony due to an upset loss in a football game.” Not surprisingly, African-American defendants bear the brunt of the judges’ unhappiness about the Tigers’ fortunes.   read more

When Investigators Realize Their Wiretap Has Mistakenly Uncovered a Different Crime, They Must Stop Listening, Rules Court

Imagine a scene straight out of an Alfred Hitchcock movie: You call a phone number, unaware that it has been wiretapped as part of a federal investigation, and incriminate yourself in a different crime altogether. Judge Gould noted the novelty of the question: Is the evidence admissible when a valid wiretap helps catch someone else who happens to be involved in a different crime? The government needs to stop listening to people's conversations when it knows it shouldn't, said Johnson.   read more

Politics of Employees are Strongly Influenced by Political Leanings of Their CEO

This election cycle, it seems that many CEOs have chosen to be less public about whom they are supporting in the presidential race. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich canceled an event at his home for Donald Trump after it was reported to be causing a firestorm among Intel employees. Some executives privately say they worry they could see reprisals against their business or industry if they were to actively campaign for one candidate or another.   read more

New FDA Tobacco Rules Bring End to Century-Old Tradition of Cigar Donations to U.S. Troops

Among the new FDA rules is a ban on the charitable donation of tobacco products. Van Trees runs Support the Troops, a nonprofit organization that sends care packages to bases in locations such as Afghanistan and Iraq. Cigars are the second-most-requested item in those packages, behind coffee and ahead of toothpaste and tube socks. "It means the world to these guys who love to sit by the fire and smoke some sticks," Van Trees said. "This is going to put a huge hole in what we do for them."   read more

Wildlife Service Unveils Plan to Protect At-Risk Species

The proposed policy responds to President Obama's November 2015 directive to key federal agencies to develop and share a "common set of their best practices to mitigate for harmful impacts to natural resources." While acknowledging that economic development, infrastructure, and national security goals are achieved at a price to our natural resources, the president's memorandum expressed his conviction that American ingenuity was up to the task of minimizing and compensating for those impacts.   read more

Atoning for Past, Georgetown University to Award Preferential Admission Status to Descendants of Slaves

“This community participated in the institution of slavery,” said Georgetown president DeGioia, addressing a crowd of hundreds of students, faculty members and descendants. “This original evil that shaped the early years of the Republic was present here. We have been able to hide from this truth, bury this truth, ignore and deny this truth. As a community and as individuals, we cannot do our best work if we refuse to take ownership of such a critical part of our history. We must acknowledge it.”   read more

From Websites to City Planning, Design Decisions Have Discriminatory Consequences

Discriminatory design and decision-making affects all aspects of our lives. Industrial design plays a role by steering human activities. For example, benches designed with prominent arm rests or shallow seats discourage homeless people from sleeping on them. This phenomenon is known as “hostile architecture." As one critic points out, it says a lot about a culture when its solution to homelessness is to put spikes on public surfaces.   read more

NBA Team Smartphone App Secretly Records Private Phone Conversations, Claims Lawsuit

Satchell says whenever the app is open, even running in the background, it turns on microphones in fans' smartphones and records them while scanning for audio signals to pinpoint their location for marketing purposes. "Her phone was present in locations and personal and private situations not generally accessible to the public where the expectation was that her conversations were to remain private," the complaint states.   read more

Heart Implant Devices Can Be Hacked to Steal Data or Harm Patients, Claims Lawsuit

In a class action that sounds like a Tom Clancy novel, a patient claims that implanted heart devices can be attacked by hackers. The security flaws not only put patients' information at risk, but the heart implants are vulnerable to attack "in ways previously not possible." For instance,someone could "modify the implant without necessarily being close to the victim," Ross says. "Such attacks can put at risk the safety of the patient with the implantable device, with fatal consequences..."   read more

Minnesota Limits Pesticides to Protect Bees

Bee expert Marla Spivak said the governor's order "puts Minnesota miles ahead of all the other states in our nation. ... Some may think that these actions go too far, but I honestly don't know a farmer, a nursery operator, a grower, a pesticide applicator that wants to kill a bee or monarch while they're controlling their crop pests." Said Gov. Dayton: "We're not trying to ban anybody's practices or businesses. but there's a lot more we can do...to protect the pollinators."   read more

Florida Man Struck by Lightning and Bitten by Rattle Snack, Python, Alligator and Poisonous Spider

Even before the latest incidents, Cook had many misadventures. He got bitten by an alligator that he "accidentally" caught while fishing. And he was bitten by his friend's Burmese python, which he was trying to feed. "It's been a rough four years," he said. "Maybe the higher up ... is trying to get your attention that maybe something is going wrong. Or maybe I've simply been in the wrong place at the wrong time my whole life." He is unemployed because the company fired him due to his absences.   read more
65 to 80 of about 1844 News
Prev 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... 116 Next