Unusual News

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Voters Increasingly Leaving TV for Internet as Source of Information

Most telling was that 76% of the voters said they watched at least one of the presidential debates when they aired. But a third of those who watched were simultaneously engaged online, whether it was to check what was being said about the debate on Twitter or to see what fact checkers were saying. The takeaway is that candidates will need to increasingly tailor approaches to the internet for what were once staples of television. “Television is not going to cut it alone,” Blizzard said.   read more

Bar Association’s Report on Trump’s Use of Libel Suits to Silence Critics is shelved out of Fear of Trump Lawsuit

ABA lawyers commissioned a report on Trump's litigation history and concluded he is a “libel bully” who had filed many meritless suits attacking his opponents and never won in court. But the bar refused to publish the report, citing “the risk of the ABA being sued by Mr. Trump.” Bodney said “It is more than a little ironic that a publication dedicated to the exploration of First Amendment issues is subjected to censorship when it seeks to publish an article about threats to free speech.”   read more

Military Judge Issues First-of-Its-Kind Order to Compel Testimony from U.S. Witness in USS Cole Bombing Trials

With the military commissions having trickled at a slow drip for the last 4 1/2 years, prosecutors say the order was an apparent effort to speed up the proceedings. Miller told the court that Gill had been taken into custody, but offered no information about where he was being held. Spath didn't say what will happen if Gill still refuses to testify. The CIA held al-Nashiri at one of its secret overseas prisons. He is among three former CIA captives whom the agency admitted to waterboarding.   read more

U.S. Sees Decrease in Number of Police Officers Killed on Duty

The report covers officers who were killed during ambushes, traffic pursuits, tactical situations, domestic disturbance calls and while handling prisoners and individuals with mental illness. More than half were on vehicle patrol when they died. Most who died — 38 — were killed with firearms. More than 50,000 officers were assaulted last year while performing their duties. And 45 law enforcement officers died accidentally in the line of duty, many during automobile and motorcycle accidents.   read more

U.S. High School Graduation Rate, Crossing All Racial Groups, Hits Record High

The nation's high school graduation rate has reached a record 83.2%, continuing a steady increase that shows improvement across all racial and ethnic groups. President Obama welcomed the higher rate as good news, but the gains come against a backdrop of decreasing scores on national math and reading tests. "More African-American and Latino students are graduating than ever before," said Obama. Gains also were seen for disabled students and those from low-income families.   read more

Court Chooses Manhattan Zoning Laws Over First Amendment, Unplugs Neon Peace Sign

For a Manhattan designer trying to shine pacifist ideals from the window of her historic 17th-story apartment, the court cut the lights Friday, providing no justice, no peace. Vosse's attorney noted that this decision could spell trouble for residents feeling the holiday spirit. "Most New Yorkers would be surprised to learn that displaying an illuminated jack-o'-lantern, menorah or Christmas wreath from their window ... could subject them to significant fines," Oliver said.   read more

EPA Uses New Law for Quick Action to Reduce Risk of 5 Toxic Chemicals

"The threats from persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals are well-documented," said EPA's Jim Jones. "The new law directs us to expedite action to reduce the risk for these chemicals, rather than spending more time evaluating them." The chemicals the EPA will expedite include two flame retardants, a chemical used to make rubber compounds, an agent that makes rubber "more pliable," and an additive to fuel, oil, gasoline or lubricant, according to an agency press release.   read more

$40 Hospital Charge for New Parents’ “Skin-to-Skin” Contact with Newborn Touches a Nerve

While his wife was delivering the baby, Grassley was asked if they would like to hold their newborn after the procedure. So he held his son between his wife’s neck and chest, while a nurse took pictures. For this, the description on the bill seemed to suggest, he was charged the fee. Grassley posted the bill on Reddit and the story quickly gained steam because it seemed to underscore a national frustration with unexpected hospital fees and arcane medical billing.   read more

Embattled Peace Sign Fights to Be Seen Atop Historic 19th-Century Manhattan High-Rise

The judges asked how much the Constitution protects not only a person's right to wave a banner but also to have it seen. The pacifist symbol held special meaning on the turret of the neighborhood's iconic Ansonia building. Built in 1899, the Ansonia earned its place on the U.S. Register of Historic Places with its connections to social idealism and scandal. It had been designed as a residential hotel with a rooftop farm, a utopian experiment at self-sufficient living.   read more

Your Surgeon is probably a Republican, Your Psychiatrist Probably a Democrat

There is no way to know exactly why certain medical specialties attract Democrats or Republicans. But researchers offered a few theories. One explanation could be money. Doctors tend to earn very high salaries compared with average Americans, but the highest-paid doctors earn many times as much as those in the lower-paying specialties. The fields with higher average salaries tended to contain more doctors who were Republican, while lower-paying fields were more popular among Democrats.   read more

Doctors’ Political Views Found to Affect Patient Care

Can physicians leave their own political ideology at the door during something as simple as a checkup? Republican and Democratic doctors differed significantly when it came to politicized issues. Republican doctors were twice as likely as their Democratic counterparts to say they'd discourage any future abortions. And Democratic doctors were 66% more likely to say they'd urge parents of small children not to store guns in the home.   read more

States Trying to Decide Who Owns Your Social Media Legacy

When a loved one dies, laws cover how their houses, cars, and other property are passed on to relatives. But the rules are murkier — and currently far more restrictive — when it comes to pictures on Facebook and emails to friends or relatives. Google, Facebook and other companies have said a federal privacy law approved decades before digital storage became common prevents them from releasing electronic memories or records unless the account owner grants permission.   read more

Colorado Now Requires Special Markings on Edible Pot

A requirement that edible marijuana products come with a diamond-shaped stamp and the letters T-H-C — not just on the packaging but on the brownies, candies and other edibles themselves — takes effect Saturday in Colorado. The rule referencing marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient was added after complaints that the treats look too much their non-intoxicating counterparts.   read more

Federal Court Strikes New Hampshire Ballot Selfie Ban

The U.S Court of Appeals for the First Circuit shot down a New Hampshire law banning voters from taking selfies with their ballots, finding its limits on free speech worse than the photos’ vote-buying potential. New Hampshire prohibited citizens from photographing and publicizing their marked ballots in 2014, by amending a statute intended to block vote-buying and voter intimidation.   read more

Huge Congressional District Not Big Enough for Candidates

A West Texas congressional district sprawls 58,000-plus square miles and two time zones, from San Antonio to just outside El Paso. Yet neither the Republican who represents it nor the Democrat trying to reclaim the seat actually lives there. The home of Republican Rep. Will Hurd, 39, is in Helotes, just outside the borders of a district that is larger in land area than 29 states. The challenger, former Rep. Pete Gallego, spends most of his time away from the district in Austin.   read more

College Republicans Endure Criticism Because of Trump

For decades, College Republicans have drawn ridicule from — and defined themselves against — the more liberal masses on college campuses. But this year has been especially nightmarish for CRs, as they call themselves. The nomination of Donald Trump, who has attacked their conservative heroes and esteemed alumni, has prompted widespread mockery from their liberal classmates, dissension from within and something of an identity crisis.   read more
33 to 48 of about 1839 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 ... 115 Next

Unusual News

33 to 48 of about 1839 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 ... 115 Next

Voters Increasingly Leaving TV for Internet as Source of Information

Most telling was that 76% of the voters said they watched at least one of the presidential debates when they aired. But a third of those who watched were simultaneously engaged online, whether it was to check what was being said about the debate on Twitter or to see what fact checkers were saying. The takeaway is that candidates will need to increasingly tailor approaches to the internet for what were once staples of television. “Television is not going to cut it alone,” Blizzard said.   read more

Bar Association’s Report on Trump’s Use of Libel Suits to Silence Critics is shelved out of Fear of Trump Lawsuit

ABA lawyers commissioned a report on Trump's litigation history and concluded he is a “libel bully” who had filed many meritless suits attacking his opponents and never won in court. But the bar refused to publish the report, citing “the risk of the ABA being sued by Mr. Trump.” Bodney said “It is more than a little ironic that a publication dedicated to the exploration of First Amendment issues is subjected to censorship when it seeks to publish an article about threats to free speech.”   read more

Military Judge Issues First-of-Its-Kind Order to Compel Testimony from U.S. Witness in USS Cole Bombing Trials

With the military commissions having trickled at a slow drip for the last 4 1/2 years, prosecutors say the order was an apparent effort to speed up the proceedings. Miller told the court that Gill had been taken into custody, but offered no information about where he was being held. Spath didn't say what will happen if Gill still refuses to testify. The CIA held al-Nashiri at one of its secret overseas prisons. He is among three former CIA captives whom the agency admitted to waterboarding.   read more

U.S. Sees Decrease in Number of Police Officers Killed on Duty

The report covers officers who were killed during ambushes, traffic pursuits, tactical situations, domestic disturbance calls and while handling prisoners and individuals with mental illness. More than half were on vehicle patrol when they died. Most who died — 38 — were killed with firearms. More than 50,000 officers were assaulted last year while performing their duties. And 45 law enforcement officers died accidentally in the line of duty, many during automobile and motorcycle accidents.   read more

U.S. High School Graduation Rate, Crossing All Racial Groups, Hits Record High

The nation's high school graduation rate has reached a record 83.2%, continuing a steady increase that shows improvement across all racial and ethnic groups. President Obama welcomed the higher rate as good news, but the gains come against a backdrop of decreasing scores on national math and reading tests. "More African-American and Latino students are graduating than ever before," said Obama. Gains also were seen for disabled students and those from low-income families.   read more

Court Chooses Manhattan Zoning Laws Over First Amendment, Unplugs Neon Peace Sign

For a Manhattan designer trying to shine pacifist ideals from the window of her historic 17th-story apartment, the court cut the lights Friday, providing no justice, no peace. Vosse's attorney noted that this decision could spell trouble for residents feeling the holiday spirit. "Most New Yorkers would be surprised to learn that displaying an illuminated jack-o'-lantern, menorah or Christmas wreath from their window ... could subject them to significant fines," Oliver said.   read more

EPA Uses New Law for Quick Action to Reduce Risk of 5 Toxic Chemicals

"The threats from persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals are well-documented," said EPA's Jim Jones. "The new law directs us to expedite action to reduce the risk for these chemicals, rather than spending more time evaluating them." The chemicals the EPA will expedite include two flame retardants, a chemical used to make rubber compounds, an agent that makes rubber "more pliable," and an additive to fuel, oil, gasoline or lubricant, according to an agency press release.   read more

$40 Hospital Charge for New Parents’ “Skin-to-Skin” Contact with Newborn Touches a Nerve

While his wife was delivering the baby, Grassley was asked if they would like to hold their newborn after the procedure. So he held his son between his wife’s neck and chest, while a nurse took pictures. For this, the description on the bill seemed to suggest, he was charged the fee. Grassley posted the bill on Reddit and the story quickly gained steam because it seemed to underscore a national frustration with unexpected hospital fees and arcane medical billing.   read more

Embattled Peace Sign Fights to Be Seen Atop Historic 19th-Century Manhattan High-Rise

The judges asked how much the Constitution protects not only a person's right to wave a banner but also to have it seen. The pacifist symbol held special meaning on the turret of the neighborhood's iconic Ansonia building. Built in 1899, the Ansonia earned its place on the U.S. Register of Historic Places with its connections to social idealism and scandal. It had been designed as a residential hotel with a rooftop farm, a utopian experiment at self-sufficient living.   read more

Your Surgeon is probably a Republican, Your Psychiatrist Probably a Democrat

There is no way to know exactly why certain medical specialties attract Democrats or Republicans. But researchers offered a few theories. One explanation could be money. Doctors tend to earn very high salaries compared with average Americans, but the highest-paid doctors earn many times as much as those in the lower-paying specialties. The fields with higher average salaries tended to contain more doctors who were Republican, while lower-paying fields were more popular among Democrats.   read more

Doctors’ Political Views Found to Affect Patient Care

Can physicians leave their own political ideology at the door during something as simple as a checkup? Republican and Democratic doctors differed significantly when it came to politicized issues. Republican doctors were twice as likely as their Democratic counterparts to say they'd discourage any future abortions. And Democratic doctors were 66% more likely to say they'd urge parents of small children not to store guns in the home.   read more

States Trying to Decide Who Owns Your Social Media Legacy

When a loved one dies, laws cover how their houses, cars, and other property are passed on to relatives. But the rules are murkier — and currently far more restrictive — when it comes to pictures on Facebook and emails to friends or relatives. Google, Facebook and other companies have said a federal privacy law approved decades before digital storage became common prevents them from releasing electronic memories or records unless the account owner grants permission.   read more

Colorado Now Requires Special Markings on Edible Pot

A requirement that edible marijuana products come with a diamond-shaped stamp and the letters T-H-C — not just on the packaging but on the brownies, candies and other edibles themselves — takes effect Saturday in Colorado. The rule referencing marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient was added after complaints that the treats look too much their non-intoxicating counterparts.   read more

Federal Court Strikes New Hampshire Ballot Selfie Ban

The U.S Court of Appeals for the First Circuit shot down a New Hampshire law banning voters from taking selfies with their ballots, finding its limits on free speech worse than the photos’ vote-buying potential. New Hampshire prohibited citizens from photographing and publicizing their marked ballots in 2014, by amending a statute intended to block vote-buying and voter intimidation.   read more

Huge Congressional District Not Big Enough for Candidates

A West Texas congressional district sprawls 58,000-plus square miles and two time zones, from San Antonio to just outside El Paso. Yet neither the Republican who represents it nor the Democrat trying to reclaim the seat actually lives there. The home of Republican Rep. Will Hurd, 39, is in Helotes, just outside the borders of a district that is larger in land area than 29 states. The challenger, former Rep. Pete Gallego, spends most of his time away from the district in Austin.   read more

College Republicans Endure Criticism Because of Trump

For decades, College Republicans have drawn ridicule from — and defined themselves against — the more liberal masses on college campuses. But this year has been especially nightmarish for CRs, as they call themselves. The nomination of Donald Trump, who has attacked their conservative heroes and esteemed alumni, has prompted widespread mockery from their liberal classmates, dissension from within and something of an identity crisis.   read more
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