Unusual News

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Noise Must Be Made by New Hybrid and Electric Cars to Save Pedestrian Lives, Says New Federal Rule

The rule requires hybrid and electric vehicles to make audible noise when traveling in reverse or forward at speeds up to about 19 mph. The sound alert isn't required at higher speeds because other factors, such as tire and wind noise, provide warning. The new rule could help prevent about 2,400 pedestrian injuries a year once all hybrids on the road are equipped to make noise, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.   read more

2,000% Increase in Election-Season Use of Term “Post-Truth” Makes it Oxford’s Word of the Year

It's a term sometimes used to describe the current political climate. Oxford Dictionaries said Wednesday that use of the term rose 2,000 percent between 2015 and 2016, often in discussions of Britain's decision to leave the European Union and the campaign of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump. It's often used in the phrase "post-truth politics" and is defined as belonging to a time in which truth has become irrelevant.   read more

U.S. Officials Cancel 15 Oil and Gas Leases of Montana Land Sacred to Native Tribes

The cancellation was aimed at preserving the Badger-Two Medicine area, a largely-undeveloped, 130,000-acre wilderness that is the site of the creation story for members of Montana's Blackfeet Nation and the Blackfoot tribes of Canada. "It should not have been leased to begin with," Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said in announcing the cancellations at her agency's headquarters in Washington, D.C. "This sets the right tone for how business should be done in the future."   read more

New Congress Gains Minorities…but is Still Overwhelmingly White

Just like college freshmen, newly elected members of the House descended on Washington Monday for a week of orientation, a class photo and a lottery to determine their offices for the next two years. The new Congress includes the first Latina senator, three House members moving across the Capitol to the Senate and a few former lawmakers who seized their old jobs back. While Congress will include a record number of minority women, Congress will remain overwhelmingly white, male and middle-aged.   read more

Facebook Status Update: Dead! Glitch at Social Media Site Wrongly Suggested Users Had Passed Away

A number of Facebook users reported that their profile page on the social network was topped with a message that referred to them by name — as if they were gone — while linking to a feature that "memorializes" the page of someone who has died. The message said Facebook hoped the users' loved ones would find comfort in seeing posts that others shared about them. Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's page had the death notice for a short time on Friday.   read more

New Hampshire Lawmaker Re-elected and Arrested on Same Day

Republican state Rep. Dick Marple was sitting outside a polling place with his campaign signs on Election Day when an officer recognized him. Marple was charged with driving without a valid license in December 2014. Authorities had issued a bench warrant for his arrest after he failed to show up for a court hearing in October. Police say Marple drove himself to the police station and was arrested. He also was re-elected to a fifth term.   read more

Interior Dept. Acts to Boost Solar and Wind Energy Projects on Public Lands

The Interior Dept said the rule would encourage renewable energy on the nation's vast swaths of public lands while generating millions of dollars in revenue. "We are facilitating responsible renewable energy development in the right places, creating jobs and cutting carbon pollution for the benefit of all Americans," said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell. It comes two months before Donald Trump takes office, and a new Republican administration could reconsider the rule or even scrap it.   read more

Trump Win Gives Big Boost to Campaign for California to Secede from Union

As election results rolled in, its Facebook contacts grew to 15,000 plus 3,000 emails and endless tweets. "It would frankly be better off if we were our own nation," said group VP Evans, calling Trump's election further evidence that America is a sinking ship. "Our ship can sail on its own." To the north, in Portland, Oregon, two residents filed a separate petition for a 2018 ballot initiative for Oregon to secede.   read more

Teenager Races against Time to Interview Surviving U.S. World War II Vets, Dying at Rate of 400 per Day

Sharma's heroes haven't been sports stars or movie stars. They've been the U.S. combat veterans who won World War II. Since childhood, he's been fascinated by the sacrifices men his age made during WWII, risking their lives for freedom, then returning home to raise families and take everyday jobs as they transitioned back to civilian life. He read every book and watched every documentary he could find. But it wasn't until high school that he became committed to meeting them.   read more

Calcium Buildup in Womb Seen as Possible Cause of Premature Births

The culprit seems to be abnormal calcium deposits that make the normally elastic amniotic sac prone to rupture. Such calcium buildup in the womb is similar to the kind that stiffens older people's arteries or causes kidney stones. Premature birth can cause lifelong health problems, and babies who are very premature can die. Sometimes there's an obvious cause, such as an infection. Yet most of the time, doctors can't explain what triggers preterm birth in an otherwise healthy pregnant woman.   read more

Shorthanded U.S. Supreme Court’s Justices Trade “Courtesy Votes” to Maintain Status Quo

A death row inmate may be alive today because a transgender Virginia student was denied the use of the bathroom of his choice this year. The two seemingly unrelated cases have one thing in common: In each, a Supreme Court justice switched sides to provide a needed fifth vote to preserve the status quo. Justice Breyer broke with liberal colleagues to provide "a courtesy vote" to four conservative justices. Chief Justice Roberts did a similar favor, switching sides to vote in another case.   read more

Age Not a Factor in Gaining Success in Life, Says Study

For years, scientists have noted that, in many fields, the most electrifying work comes earlier in life rather than later. Now, a big-data analysis finds a host of factors that have nothing to do with age or early stardom. It is, they suggest, a combination of personality, persistence and pure luck, as well as intelligence, that leads to high-impact success — at any age. It was entirely because of productivity: scientists were as likely to score a hit at age 50 as at age 25.   read more

America’s 3 Worst Airports Are All in New York Area, Says Study

La Guardia Airport, famously described by Vice President Joe Biden in 2014 as akin to what one would find “in a Third World country,” ranked as the worst. Right behind it were JFK International and Newark Liberty. La Guardia had the highest rate of flight delays and cancellations, the second-longest drive time to the center of the city and steep parking rates. JFK had the longest drive time and longest security waits. Newark had “lackluster ratings across the board.”   read more

Summer Break Puts American School Children at Highest Risk of Excess Weight Gain

Children’s ability to maintain a healthy weight can slip when they are out of school, much like their reading and math skills. Experts note that in the summer, children do not have a strict, school-defined schedule, so they spend more sedentary time snacking in front of screens. They go to bed later and get less sleep (which can contribute to weight gain). By contrast, school offers a built-in protective structure for weight-and-fitness maintenance.   read more

Next White House Occupant to Inherit Obama’s Social Media Accounts…and all his Followers

The next president of the United States will start with a huge following on Twitter but a clean slate of tweets. It's all part of the peaceful transition of power in the social media age. The White House said Monday that Obama's official @POTUS account will be taken over by the next president. Obama is leaving office with far more digital content to archive than any previous president. Thousands of hours of video and millions of photos will have to be transferred.   read more

Americans Blame Obesity on Lack of Willpower, Despite Evidence that it’s Genetic

Obesity specialists said the survey paints an alarming picture, going against evidence about the science behind the disease and shows that outdated notions about obesity persist, to the detriment of those affected. “It’s frustrating to see doctors and the general public stigmatize patients with obesity and blame these patients, ascribing attributes of laziness or lack of willpower,” said Prof. Dr. Donna Ryan. “It’s so revealing of a real lack of education and knowledge.”   read more
17 to 32 of about 1839 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 ... 115 Next

Unusual News

17 to 32 of about 1839 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 ... 115 Next

Noise Must Be Made by New Hybrid and Electric Cars to Save Pedestrian Lives, Says New Federal Rule

The rule requires hybrid and electric vehicles to make audible noise when traveling in reverse or forward at speeds up to about 19 mph. The sound alert isn't required at higher speeds because other factors, such as tire and wind noise, provide warning. The new rule could help prevent about 2,400 pedestrian injuries a year once all hybrids on the road are equipped to make noise, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.   read more

2,000% Increase in Election-Season Use of Term “Post-Truth” Makes it Oxford’s Word of the Year

It's a term sometimes used to describe the current political climate. Oxford Dictionaries said Wednesday that use of the term rose 2,000 percent between 2015 and 2016, often in discussions of Britain's decision to leave the European Union and the campaign of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump. It's often used in the phrase "post-truth politics" and is defined as belonging to a time in which truth has become irrelevant.   read more

U.S. Officials Cancel 15 Oil and Gas Leases of Montana Land Sacred to Native Tribes

The cancellation was aimed at preserving the Badger-Two Medicine area, a largely-undeveloped, 130,000-acre wilderness that is the site of the creation story for members of Montana's Blackfeet Nation and the Blackfoot tribes of Canada. "It should not have been leased to begin with," Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said in announcing the cancellations at her agency's headquarters in Washington, D.C. "This sets the right tone for how business should be done in the future."   read more

New Congress Gains Minorities…but is Still Overwhelmingly White

Just like college freshmen, newly elected members of the House descended on Washington Monday for a week of orientation, a class photo and a lottery to determine their offices for the next two years. The new Congress includes the first Latina senator, three House members moving across the Capitol to the Senate and a few former lawmakers who seized their old jobs back. While Congress will include a record number of minority women, Congress will remain overwhelmingly white, male and middle-aged.   read more

Facebook Status Update: Dead! Glitch at Social Media Site Wrongly Suggested Users Had Passed Away

A number of Facebook users reported that their profile page on the social network was topped with a message that referred to them by name — as if they were gone — while linking to a feature that "memorializes" the page of someone who has died. The message said Facebook hoped the users' loved ones would find comfort in seeing posts that others shared about them. Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's page had the death notice for a short time on Friday.   read more

New Hampshire Lawmaker Re-elected and Arrested on Same Day

Republican state Rep. Dick Marple was sitting outside a polling place with his campaign signs on Election Day when an officer recognized him. Marple was charged with driving without a valid license in December 2014. Authorities had issued a bench warrant for his arrest after he failed to show up for a court hearing in October. Police say Marple drove himself to the police station and was arrested. He also was re-elected to a fifth term.   read more

Interior Dept. Acts to Boost Solar and Wind Energy Projects on Public Lands

The Interior Dept said the rule would encourage renewable energy on the nation's vast swaths of public lands while generating millions of dollars in revenue. "We are facilitating responsible renewable energy development in the right places, creating jobs and cutting carbon pollution for the benefit of all Americans," said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell. It comes two months before Donald Trump takes office, and a new Republican administration could reconsider the rule or even scrap it.   read more

Trump Win Gives Big Boost to Campaign for California to Secede from Union

As election results rolled in, its Facebook contacts grew to 15,000 plus 3,000 emails and endless tweets. "It would frankly be better off if we were our own nation," said group VP Evans, calling Trump's election further evidence that America is a sinking ship. "Our ship can sail on its own." To the north, in Portland, Oregon, two residents filed a separate petition for a 2018 ballot initiative for Oregon to secede.   read more

Teenager Races against Time to Interview Surviving U.S. World War II Vets, Dying at Rate of 400 per Day

Sharma's heroes haven't been sports stars or movie stars. They've been the U.S. combat veterans who won World War II. Since childhood, he's been fascinated by the sacrifices men his age made during WWII, risking their lives for freedom, then returning home to raise families and take everyday jobs as they transitioned back to civilian life. He read every book and watched every documentary he could find. But it wasn't until high school that he became committed to meeting them.   read more

Calcium Buildup in Womb Seen as Possible Cause of Premature Births

The culprit seems to be abnormal calcium deposits that make the normally elastic amniotic sac prone to rupture. Such calcium buildup in the womb is similar to the kind that stiffens older people's arteries or causes kidney stones. Premature birth can cause lifelong health problems, and babies who are very premature can die. Sometimes there's an obvious cause, such as an infection. Yet most of the time, doctors can't explain what triggers preterm birth in an otherwise healthy pregnant woman.   read more

Shorthanded U.S. Supreme Court’s Justices Trade “Courtesy Votes” to Maintain Status Quo

A death row inmate may be alive today because a transgender Virginia student was denied the use of the bathroom of his choice this year. The two seemingly unrelated cases have one thing in common: In each, a Supreme Court justice switched sides to provide a needed fifth vote to preserve the status quo. Justice Breyer broke with liberal colleagues to provide "a courtesy vote" to four conservative justices. Chief Justice Roberts did a similar favor, switching sides to vote in another case.   read more

Age Not a Factor in Gaining Success in Life, Says Study

For years, scientists have noted that, in many fields, the most electrifying work comes earlier in life rather than later. Now, a big-data analysis finds a host of factors that have nothing to do with age or early stardom. It is, they suggest, a combination of personality, persistence and pure luck, as well as intelligence, that leads to high-impact success — at any age. It was entirely because of productivity: scientists were as likely to score a hit at age 50 as at age 25.   read more

America’s 3 Worst Airports Are All in New York Area, Says Study

La Guardia Airport, famously described by Vice President Joe Biden in 2014 as akin to what one would find “in a Third World country,” ranked as the worst. Right behind it were JFK International and Newark Liberty. La Guardia had the highest rate of flight delays and cancellations, the second-longest drive time to the center of the city and steep parking rates. JFK had the longest drive time and longest security waits. Newark had “lackluster ratings across the board.”   read more

Summer Break Puts American School Children at Highest Risk of Excess Weight Gain

Children’s ability to maintain a healthy weight can slip when they are out of school, much like their reading and math skills. Experts note that in the summer, children do not have a strict, school-defined schedule, so they spend more sedentary time snacking in front of screens. They go to bed later and get less sleep (which can contribute to weight gain). By contrast, school offers a built-in protective structure for weight-and-fitness maintenance.   read more

Next White House Occupant to Inherit Obama’s Social Media Accounts…and all his Followers

The next president of the United States will start with a huge following on Twitter but a clean slate of tweets. It's all part of the peaceful transition of power in the social media age. The White House said Monday that Obama's official @POTUS account will be taken over by the next president. Obama is leaving office with far more digital content to archive than any previous president. Thousands of hours of video and millions of photos will have to be transferred.   read more

Americans Blame Obesity on Lack of Willpower, Despite Evidence that it’s Genetic

Obesity specialists said the survey paints an alarming picture, going against evidence about the science behind the disease and shows that outdated notions about obesity persist, to the detriment of those affected. “It’s frustrating to see doctors and the general public stigmatize patients with obesity and blame these patients, ascribing attributes of laziness or lack of willpower,” said Prof. Dr. Donna Ryan. “It’s so revealing of a real lack of education and knowledge.”   read more
17 to 32 of about 1839 News
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